EGZAMIN KoNCowY Z JĘZYKA ANGIELSKIEG$ I{A P$Z`Itr,}M

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EGZAMIN KoNCowY Z JĘZYKA ANGIELSKIEG$ I{A P$Z`Itr,}M
EGZAMIN KoNCowY Z JĘZYKA ANGIELSKIEG$ I{A
"
P$Z'Itr,}M-{E 82
otlpowiedzi na pytania do testólv 1, 2, 3.t,3.Ż i 3.3 'łvpistlj na *rantę odpowiedzi
numer 1
odpowiedzi na pytania do testórł' 3.4' 3.5 i 4 wrlisui na lłgr{ę odpołv'iedzi numer
2
in możesz uzvskać l60 nunktórł"
za. ca
'= Do wszystkich częściegzaminu dołączone są instrnkcje. Prz*cev{a.6 je uważnie, zanirn
przystąpisz do rozwiązywrłnia zadań testowych.
II{STRUKCJA TESTOIYA
otrzvrrlałaś/eśksiążeczkę testolvą dwie
kaĘ odpowierlzi
i ołówek.
ROZWIĄZUJ TESTY 7,2,3.1,3.2 i3.3 (I'YTANIA 1-6s) NA I{*ĄRCIE ot}PowIEDL{
NUMER 1 w NASTĘPUJĄCY SPoSoB:
!
.
.
.
.
Do kazdego pytania podane sątrzy odpowiedzi do wyłmni, oznŁtcz&nt łiterar.ni A,B,C.
Wybieraj za kazdym razem jedną prawidłową odpowiedź.
Mozęsz wykorzysĘrvać ksiązeczkę testową do zaznaczarria ocipowiedzj ,,łlx Łrnttc{no''.
Na kartę odpowiedzi nanieśostateczną x'ersję, zaczerniaja;c B{}KŁAI}NXE OŁd)WKIBIł{
caĘ wybrany przez siebie prostokącik.
tF:
RozwIĄZUJ TESTY 3.4 i 3.5 (PYTANIA 61-90} ORAE TE$'x] 4 NA KARCIE
oDPowiEDZI NUMER 2 W I.{ASTĘPUJĄCY SFoSsł}:
.
.
.
Niniejszą książeczkę testorvą moZeSZ wykorz-vstać do rozlłiązyrvania testu ,,na brudno''.
'
Pisz wyraź.nie! Nieczyteine pismo nie bętizie brarre
\Ą/szystkie odpowiedzi wpisuj
DŁUGOPISE${
na osobnej karcie odpowiedzi.
Tęst 4 rnozesz napisac ,,na brudno'' na odwrcc:e str'on ksiłpecrki tesłovlej.
po<tr
ulvagę!
EGZAMIN KoNColvY Z IĘZYKA ANGrELSKIEGO NA POZI()MIE 82
TĘ CZĘSC TESTU RozwIĄZUJ NA KARCIE oDPowIEDZI NR
1
Test 1: Rozumienie ze słuchu (20 pkt.) pytania 1-10
Za chwilę usĘszysz krótĘ audycję radiową. 7-apoznai się ze zdaniami l-l0, a nasiępnie,
po dwukrotnym wysłuchaniu tekstu, za.Trl,aczwlaściwe opcje ich zakończeń. W każdym
prrypadku Ętko jedna jest całkowicie poprawna. Słuchając audycji nnożesz robić
notatki w książeczce testowej. Z.aznacz na karcie odpowiedzi nr 1 odpowiednią literę
obok właściwegonumeru zdania.
Listen to the short radio błoadcast and, on the basis of what you hear, choose the rigltt
option in each graup of three provided Mark your answers on ansłł,ełsheet l.
1. The area around the Alcatraz prison is at present inhabited by
A.
B.
C.
famous criminals and gangsters.
about 100 species ofbirds.
four species of birds.
2. Wildlifers of Alcatraz portrays birds as
A. bloodthirsty, violent and competitive.
B. friendly towards prisoners, and gentle.
C. clever and beautiful.
3. Robert StrouĄ 'the Bird Man of Alcatraz' was
A.
sometimes violent towards błds.
and caring towards birds.
cruel towards bloodthirsty gulls.
B- kind
C.
4- Trees of Trafalgar
A.
B.
C'
will be broadcast on
Sunday 9e in thę morning.
Sunday 9e in the evening.
'Wednęsday
at 7 o'clock.
i
5. To build Admiral Nelson's fleet it took
A.
B.
C.
3700 one-hundred-year*ld oaks per ship.
3700 one-hundred-year-old oaks for all27 English ships.
72 one-hundred-year-old oaks per ship.
6. The 'Trafalgar Woods' Project
A- is concerned about the growing demand for oak wood.
B. has planted 33 oak woodlands.
C. wants to plant 250,000 oak treęs.
7
- InThe State oJ'Africa, Julian Petifer
presents a safari hotel charging over $1000 a night to
illustrate how its guests
A. arę cheated by the local peopleB. overpay for their encotrntęrs with wildlife.
C. contribute to the development of the local community.
8. The 'cancęr bush' is gradually being driven to extinction by
A.
B.
C.
cancer, HIV and AIDS sufferers who overexpioit it for its healing propeńies.
competitive foreign species introduced by people.
Australian companie:; p,t:ducing medici:es.
9. The State of Afł'lcc programme broadcast on Wednesday 12ń is going to be
A_ the first in the serięs.
B. the third in the series.
C. the last in the series.
10. The recommended programmes are going to be broarjcast by
A.
B.
C.
four British channels.
three different BBC channels.
the same channel * Radio 4.
Test 2: Rozumienie tekstu pisanego (20 pkt.) pytania lt_Ż0
Przeczyta! uważnie poniższy tekst, a następnie wybierz wlaściwedokończenia zdań
spośńdtnech podanych możliwości.W każdym przypadku Ęlko jedna opcja jest w
pełni popnwna. Swój wybór z^zllacz na karcie odpowiedzi nr 1.
Read the text below and compkte the sentences thatfollow it by choosing the rtgfu optiołt
Mark your snswets on answer sheet I.
UK 'missing out on foreign study'
British students are missing out on the chance to study in another European country as
part of their university course, the European Commission says. Only 7214 tIK students took
paft in the European Commission's "flagship" educational programme Erasmus in the last
academic year, compared with 7539 the previous year.
By contrast, numbers from other countries continue to ńse, last year's total of 144'000
students participating in the university exchange scheme being up from the 135,586 reported
the previous year. About three times as many students as from the tIK came from France,
Germany and Spain (more than 20,000 in each case). Also ahead of the IJK was Italy, and
even new EU Member State Poland..
Established in 1987, Erasmus allows undergraduates to take part of their degree course in
one of 31 other European countries. The courses can be in any subject, grants are available,
and some classes are even given in English.
John Reilly, Director of the IJK Socrates-Erasmus Council, said the numbers were
"disappointing", noting that a previous study by the Higher Education Funding Council for
England had referred to linguistic and financial factors as major barriers to student
participation. However, he added: "There is no doubt that linguistic and financial reasons are
primary factors, but they could be managed if there was the cultural motivation. There is more
of a mobility culture in other countries and students there recognise that this is the way the
world is, and that, if you want to raise your employability, then you need to develop these
skills." Overall, the picture had to be considered "worrying from the perspective of the UK as
a global player", Mr Reilly said.
Ashling Withers, a Media, French and Business student at Salford University, told the BBC
News website: "I spent a year in Clermont-Ferrand, France' as part of the Erasmtłs exchange'
and as a result can now speak good French . . . and it has influenced me to apply for jobs
abroad ... and I'm looking into learning Spanish when I graduate. However, I don't think it is
solely a problem with cultural and language issues within British people, but partly to do with
the awareness of the programme. Itly course incorporated the programme as compulsory"
otherwise I would have had little or no knowledge about it."
Another student, Ben Shapland, said. "I chose to study Italian at university, because I had
enjoyed studying foreign languages at school. However, I had not taken any language past
Advanced Supplementary level. 'l'he problein fbr me is the teaching and prornotion of foreign
languages in schools ... sadly part of a broader cultural problem. A large number of British
people have no conception of the world outside the {lK, except for holiday destinations where
there is usually no need to speak any language other than English."
But Sarah Cromwell, a Law and French student "wholeheartedly enjoying" her time at
Robert Schuman University in Strasbourg, France, said: "I think it is a disservice to blame
students for not using the Erąsmus scheme to their advantage, wheir really it is the EC and the
universities themselves who do little to actively promote the scheme on British campuses. She
added: "Thousands of students flock to programmes like Camp America and Bunac every
summer, and this is due not only to the schemes' longstanding reputations, but also to their
rnarketing and publicity on university campuses across the tlK. Why doesn't the EC follow
this successful exampłe instead of doing an injustice to British students by saying they lack
the pre-requisite skills for educational exchanges?"
Adapted from: hę://news.bbc.co.uk, published: 20f,6/03 l 11
British undergraduates studying abroad
was higher n2003/2004 than n200412005.
11. The number of
A.
B.
C.
did not change in the two most recent academic y€ars.
was lower :r:.Ż003/2004 than nŻ004l2005.
12. The continental trend towards studying abroad is
A. the reverse of tłrat in the UK.
B. gorng in tlre same diręction as in the UK.
C. rather similłrr to the British one.
13. Compared with the number of French students, the number
abroad last year was
A. about 3000lower.
B. only just over one third as high.
C. almost thręę times higher.
students studying
l
14. Last year Poland was the country of origin
A.
B.
C.
of UK
of
fewer university exchange students than the UK.
more university exchange students than the UK.
the samę number of students studying abroad as the
15. The findings of a study into the reasons for
UI(
British students' limited participation in
foreign exchanges are
A. rejected by John Reilly as doubtful.
B. agreed with in fullby Reilly.
C. acknowledged by Reilly with some reservations.
16. From the
A.
B.
C.
British point of view, the low student exchange figures seent
surprising.
distłirbing.
acceptable.
17 Ashling Withers implies that her stay in France has
A.
B.
C.
motivateci her to learn another foreign language.
given her a job abroad.
guaranteed her a top grade in French.
l8' Ashling might
A.
B.
C.
not have participated in an Erasmus exchange with France if shę
hadn't applied for a job abroad.
were studying a different subject.
had not spoken good French in advance.
i9. In Ben Shapland's view, the main reason why UK stuCents miss out on foreign studies is
A.
B.
C.
inadequate promotion of the programme.
their lack of knowledge of foreign languages.
insufficiently motivating school teaching.
20. Sarah Cromwell puts the blame for the reiatively low popularity of the Erąsłnus
programme on
A. the competition frorn Canłp America and Bunac.
B. students themselves, who lack the necessary skills.
C. trniversities and the Ełnopean Community.
Test 3: Formy i struktury językowe w komunikacji (80 pkt.)
3.1. pytania 21-30 (10 pkt.)
W każdym z poniżxzych zdań zostaĘ podkreślonetrzy elemenĘ, lrtóre ozns'cuono
literami A, B, C. Jeden zĘch e|ementów jest zawsze niepoprawnY w kontek{cie calego
zdania. Dla każdego zdania rrstal, o który element chodzi, a następnię7łrn*xr swoje
rozwiązanie na karcie odpowiedzi nr 1. Zaznacz literę odpowiadającą wybranej przez
ciebie możliwościobok właściwegonumeru pytania.
There are three underlined elements (marked A, B and C) in sentences 2l-3fr belołg. In
each sentence, identify the element that is wrong. Mark your answers oft &nswer sheet 1.
21. I would stop [A] to ęat so [B] much junk food if I [C] were Pam.
Ż2. |A]Don't let us quarrel any longer. Let's [B] discuss about it, [C] shall we?
23. Bob [A] wouldn't have beęn so rich now' [B] would he' if it [C] hadn't been for the
money left to him by his łate arrnt?
24.I really need [A] to havę the car serviced. I tB] oughtn't have ieft it [C] this
tł;ng.
25. I [A] was wondering how [B] could I get the tickęts for the show [C] that begins at five.
26-
[A] will have completed the course, he [B] will be able to run the oftice
[C] on his own at last.
As soon
as he
27. Jim [A] is thought to be very [B] tŁed - he [C] is always making a nuisance of himself.
28. I remember that [A] friend of theirs who was so [B] keen to know when Foland [Cl will
join the European Union.
29.I'd like [A] it that you remembsl: what [B] I've explained to you right ruiw
for all.
30. I'd rather you [A] hea'rd tB] il1ęsę news, before [C] it makes the headlines.
[C]l once and
3.2" pytania 31-50 (20 Pict.)
w nim luki
Przeczytaj uważ.nie poniższy tekst, a następnie uzupelnij występujące
podanych pod tekstem'
wybierają c la t<zżdym raz€m jedną z tniia nnożliwości(A, Bo C)
odpowiedzi nr I zaznacz literę
:ryrr<o j"oo" opcja jest w petni poprawna. Na karcie
numeru pytania'
odpowiadaj ą"ą *y"ir.unej'przez ciet'ie możliwościobok właściwego
Mark your choices
gapin eech
Read the text and choose the one option that would best fit
(A,BrC) on dns$,er sheet
1.
of Cambridge will also
essentially a paradise for cyclists, the elegant market town
32) - in the 13e century
give a great deal of enjoyment to walkerr. ih" Uniiersity was
oldest and grandest are along Tńnity
and is 33)--- of thirty-two individual colleges. The
151 1, boasts one of the finest dining
Street and King's Parade. St. John's, dating Sa)
famous for its Bridge of
rooms in Cambridge, and the most beautiń gut.t'o*". It's also
St John's is Tńnity' Establishe'd
Sighs - inspired by iis counterpart in Venice]Looming over
35)- by s91s. of the royal
by Henry VIII in 154ó, it's the largest college, traditińaty
cobbled couĘards' past Sir Christopher Wr€n's
family. Walking thro.rgh Trinity';6)
the River Cam' Here you can wander through manicured
magnificent library, you 37)are 38)--to walk on thę
gardens a.rd urounj .rioo"jr"** (only fellows ofthe college
39)-- of the river' If it's warm' try your
}ass) down to the eacń' the meadow-like
40)--- at boating d"ń it'" river - boats "* u" łt;--- for a smalł fee from Trinity
ColĘp, or you may prefer a'chauffeured' 42)-'
43). Rose
As you continue along narTow and windńg rrinity Street, turn
the chic boutiques before
Crescent and indulge in somJwindow 44).--'--as you pass
the squareis the small Churcłi
emerging into the Jolourful' bustling **["t pru"". łs;
gives you a truly wonderful
of St Mary's. A short climb to the ło)-_- ór tt'" tower
ął)_--"f the 'dreaming spires' - so don't forget your camera!gallery of Kettle's Yard" at the
Two museu** *.Il48)---- a visit *. th" modern-ań
in Trumpington.Street' Founded
foot of Castle Hill and the fascinating Fitzwilliam Museum,
for its antiquities' paintings
in 1816, it's one of the oldest museums in the country and famous
and porcelain - from Egyptian jewellery to'Delft China T)ws'
50),oo^, th" riotanic Gardens offer a scented garden,
Just south ii1-'"
plants, glass-houset anO i duck pond' Enjoy your visit!
31)---
Adapted ftom: Cambridge - historic universiĘ ciĘ' Hello! Magazine
31. A. Despite
B. Although
C. In spite of
32. A. set out
B. set up
C. sęt off
33. A" made up
B" made out
C. consistęd
34 A. back
B. from
C. to
35 A. attended
B. studied
C. participated
36. A. antique
B. ancient
C. elderly
37. A. reach
B. achieve
C" arrive
38. A. approved
B. let
C. ailowed.
39. A. banks
R. shore
C. coast
40. A. furger
B. hand
C. thurnb
hired
42- A- travel
43. A. in
44. A. shopping
45. A. Overcoming
46. A. peak
47. A. view
48- A. worthy
49. A. to
50. A. seldom
lent
B. voyage
B. into
B. <ilspiaying
B. Overseeing
B. summit
B. sight
B. worthwhile
B. from
B. rare
41. A.
B.
C. borrowed
C. trip
C. to
C. buying
C. Overlooking
C. top
C. outlook
C. wońh
C. of
C. ęxtinct
3.3. pytania 51-ó0 (10 pkt.)
Uzupełnij tuki rvybierając spośńd ttzech możliwościpodanych bezpośrednio pod
każdym zdaniem. W każdym pr2ypadku tylko jedna możliwośćw pełni pasuje do
kontekstu i przedstawionej sytuacji.
Zaznaez swoje odpowiedzi na karcie odpowiedzi nr 1.
Choose the option (A, B, C) that best compleles each sentełtce Mark your answers on
answer sheet I.
51. I wish you _
swearing. It's so annoying.
A. would stop
B. had stopped
52. Sheila was
A. give
53.
made
up
They
A. must
smoking by her parents.
B. giving up
55. It's been ages since I firrt
raised
for America.
leave
B.
--
rose
57. Wrat do you suggest
do
58. It's high time you
A.
come
__,
------
it
unless
60. When I was little I _
A. was used to
you a fortune.
C. has to cost
now that the situation has changed?
C. that I did
B. doing
back home.
B. have
59. Jenny's mum said she couldn't
A.
leff:
C. risęn
cost--
cost
ts)
C. have
this question.
56. 'l-hat new dress you bought looks very expensive.
B. must have
A. must
A.
C. to give up
have left yet. The light in the front room is still on.
C. can't
B. shouldn't
54. By the time you read this letter I _
B. will
A. will have left
A.
C. stopped
come
go to the disco
B. provided
C- came
she cleaned up her room fust.
C. as long as
like drinking milk before going to bed.
B. used to
C. got usęd to
PoNIZsZĄCzĘŚc
rrsru RoZwIĄZUJ
ODPOWTEDZT NR
NA KARCIE
2
3.4- pytania 61-80 (20 pkt.)
Przeczytaj uważnie poniźsry tekst. a następnie uzupelnij występujące w nim luki. W
jedną lukę możesz wstawić tylko JEDNO słowo. Upewnij się, cry uzupełniony pr:zez
ciebie tekst tworzy poprawną gramatycznie, Iogiczną całośga następnie przenieś swoje
ronviązania na kańę odpowiedzi nr 2. Pamiętaj o poprawn{}ści ońograficnrej
wpisywanych wyrazów!
Read the text and complete each numbered gap witlt oNE suitable łłordWrite your
ansłłerson ansv)er sheet 2.
61)_
I'll tell you this, but you
62)--
have to promise that it will go
further. Not
we moved here we had the people next door round for dinner and - I swear this is true
drove.
after
- they
I was astounded, but I have since come to realize that 63)_
was nothing especially
odd in their driving less than a 64)_
of hundred feet to visit us. Nobody walks anywhere
in America nowadays.
A researcher at the University of California at Berkeley made a study of the nation's
walking habits and concluded 65)_ 85% of people in 66)_ united States are
'essentially' sedentary and35Yo are'totally' sedentary. The averąe Arnerican walks less than
75 miles a year - about 1.4 miles a week" barely 350 yards a day. [. .] That's appallingly
little. I rack up more mileage than that just looking 67)_the channel changer.
One of the things we wanted when we moved to America 68)_
to live in a town
69)_--- walking distance of shops. Hanover, 70).-- we settled, is a small, typical New
England coilege town, pleasant, sedate and compact. [...] Nearly everyone in town is within a
level five-minute walk of the shops, and yet, as 71)
as I can tell, virtually no one does.
I walk to town nearly 7Ż)-day when I am at home. I go to the post offtce or
library or the local bookshop [...]. Every few weeks or so I call 73)-- at the barbershop
and 74)
one of the guys there do something lively with 75)_
hair. All this is a big
part of my life and I wouldn't dream of doing it other than 7ó)--.- foot. People have
77)-used to this curious and eccentńc behaviour now' but several times in the early days
passing neighbours 78)-- slow by the kerb and ask if I wanted a lift.
'But I'm going your way,' they'd insist when I politely declined. 'Really, it's no
bother.'
'Honestly, I enjoy walking.'
'Well, if you are absolutely sure,' they'd say and depart reluctantly, even guiltily,
79)_ if they felt they 80)_ leaving the scene of an accident [. . ]
From:
.A/o/es
From ą Big Countryby Bill Bryson.
3.5. pytania 81-90 (20 pkt
)
Zareaguj po angielsku stosownie do sytuacji. Swoje rozwiązania _ rv formie krótkich
wypowiedzi, najczęściejpojedynczych zdań _ nanieśna kańę odpowiedzi nr 2.
How will you react in thefollowing situafions? Wńte your utterances on answer sheet 2.
8l. Poradz koledze,
aby uwaz nie przejrzał notatki z wykładow, jeślinie chce oblac
egzaminu.
82' Poproś kolegę, zeby ściągnąłz Internetu i wydrukował wasz no'v\T plan zajęó.
83. Spytaj przyjacicia, czy zamierzazapist:ó się na intensywny kurs niemieckiego.
84. obiecaj kolezance, żebędziesz trzymał Zaruąkciuki podczas egzaminu.
85. Nie byłeśna pierwszym wykładzie.
Spyaj kolegę z roku, jaki jest nowy wykładowca.
86. Poproś zrajorną o przekazanie twoich pozdrowień dla jej całej rodziny.
87. Zapytaj orgarńzatora
wycieczki, czy cena obejmuje ubezpieczenie.
88. Zapytaj kołeżankę,do kiedy ważny jest jej paszport.
89. Jesteś w aptece. Spytaj, czy sąjakieśsilne środkiprzeciwbóiowe do kupienia bez recepty.
90. Dzwonisz do kolegi, dowiadujesz się, że nie ma go w domu. Spytaj, czy możeszzostawić
dla niego wiadomość-
Test 4: Wypowiedź pisemna (40 pkt.)
W arĘkule' z którym zapoznałeśsię w teściedrugim cąytamy:
..-'Erasmus' allows undergraduates to take part of their degree course in
jl
one of
other
European countries. The courses can be in any subject, grants are availąble, and some
classes are eyen given in English.
Napisz krótkic wypracowanie (na 200-250 słów) na temat:
Would you or łłouldyou not like to take part in aforeign student exchange programme?
For wltat reasons? If so, in which country would you choose to study and why?
In the article given in test two we read:
...'Erasmus' allows undergraduates to take part of their degree course in one of 31 other
European countries. The courses can be in any subject, grants are available, and some
classes are even given in English.
.!
Write a shoń composition
(of 200_250 words) on the topic:
Would you or would you not like to take part in aforeign student exchange programme?
For what reasons? If so, in which country would you choose to study and whjt?
S IS TTIE EIYD OF
THE
I'ISTENING COMPREHEI{SIO|{ -82 (czerwiec)
Anci now for this month's pick of,tr.l dio 4 progralrunes 1or iisteners interesied in nature
an<i iile envj'rołrnent.
on Monday 3'd. at 9 p.m.' fune in 'ior Wiidli-fers af Alcatł'az-the first of the three
programmes we wanr to recommenci While gangsters Ai Capone and'Machine Gun
Keily' went dou,n in history as bad-guys ending up on that island in San Francisco Bay.
even their behaviour can hardly match that of the ieańered inhabitairts of Alcau'az todavHoward Stabletbrd finds crimes more violent than the prisoners dreamed of among ihe
island's Western gulis, cof,morants, brorm pelicans and night herons. These are just some
of the i00 bird species now occurring around the crumbling pnson builclmgs. And it's the
competition *o.'g thern that lęads= birds to steal food and murdęr their neighbours'
chicks. Some say that Robert StrouĄ the 'BirćlMan of Alcatraz:, was neąriv as
bloodthirsty as those gulls, though he is knou'n for being gentie rvith his birds, and tbr all
he rł'as able to 1ęarn about them. Now new studies are revęaling the srrrvival strategies
behind birds' sometimes-violent bęhaviorrr. Howmd puts these ornithological stories
together with those of past criminals and guards. It's an offer you can't refuse.
Another combination of nature and history is on oilbr on Sundav 9e, at 8.35 a.m.,
in Trees of T.rafatgar. ln October 1805, the Royal Navy under Lord Neison defeated the
combined lrrench an.d Spanish fleets offCape Trafalgar, sotlth-west Spain, preventing
Napolecn liom invading Britain. It was Nelson's 27 ships against 32. In the programme,
presenter Pau} Er'ans telis us how the vessels were cons[ructed, and horł'it took 3700 oak
rees (each 100 years oid) to build a sinele 7?--gunwiuship. Fearless in battle. Nelson
worrieo most about Britain's forests running out of decent timber, but by 1805 the countrlr
was in a &enzy of ship-building, depleting its oakwoods at breakneck speed. The demand
for wooden warships Łras passed, but today, two cenfurie.s after the battle, the Trafalgar
Woods Proiect intends to plant 250,000 young oak trees and 33 new woodlands. Paul
Evans te1ls the story on 9th at 8.35 a.m.
Beginning on Wednesday 12th, at 7 in the evenińg' is our third and final
ręcommęndation - another chance to catch The State of Afi'ica, in which Julian Pettifer
addresses environmental and human heaith issues of that continent. Experts say the only
way to deal with Africa's big conservation issues is to first tackle the huge probiem of
nrral pov'ęrty_ - A&ica needs money. Julian travels across the continent to learn more_
Arrrong his siopovćfŚ is a safari_hotel in Nąta! South Africą which charges over $ 1000
per night 1br 5-star service and encounters w1i6 Aftican rł'ildlife' nruch of |Ęe moqey
helping to develop lócal villąes. businesses, schools and hospirals. Later we learn abÓut
treaiing plants, including the 'cancer bush' which seeńś to help with the syilptoms otHIY anij ful}-blown AIDS, as well as cancer. But, iike many other Atrican species, this
plant is str'uggiing to słrrvive. Competitors introduced into South Africa from Austraiia
,-** to be taki:rg over, ciriving the 'cancer bush' towards extinction. Julian meets peopie
with i{lv- or AIDS who are heiped by the plant. and so have the strongest possible
motivation to coordinate contuol measures against the fbreign plants that pose the
threat. Much food tbr thought. then, in the first of three half-hour proqrammes on The
State oj-Africa,whicir you can hear on l?'h. at 7 p-mAnd that's o16 choice of nature progmmmes comirrg up ńis month- Jusl some of
the items on off'ęr on Rcltłio 4_ For fuitlrer details, please consuli the BBC v,'ebsite. and
stal'' tuneci-
EGZAMIN KoNCowY z JĘzyKA ANGIELSKIEGO
_
PGZIOM 82
(Sesja czerwcowa 2006)
KI.-UCZ DO ODPOWIEDZI _ PYTANIA 1-60
1.8
Ż.A
3.8
4.A
5.4
6.C
7.C
8.B
9.A
c
10.
11. A
1Ż. A
13. B
14. B
15. C
16. B
L7. A
18. B
19. C
24. C
A
24.8
25. B
41. A
4Ż. C
43. B
44. A
45. C
26.
46.
B
B
3Ż.B
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
21-
Ż2.B
Ż3. A
A
27.8
28. C
Ż9. A
30.
31.
33.
34.
3s.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
A
B
A
B
s3.
s4.
C
L
C
C
B
A
C
c
A
55. A
A
B
s7. B
A
s8.
s9.
C
B
56.
60.
c
A
B
EGZAMIN KoNCowY
z rĘzYKA ANGIELSKIEGO _ PoZIoM
(Sesja cz€rwcowa
2006)
KLIJCZ Do oDPowIEDZI - PYTANIA
61. no
65. that
69. within
73. in
77. gotlbecome
62. long
6ó. the
70. where
74-havellet
78. would/did
82
ó1_90
ó4. counle
ó8. was
7Ż. every
76. on
80. were
63. there
ó7. for/out
7I. far
75. my
79. as
81. (You'd better) look / go / read through the lęctwe notes carefully if you don't want to fail
the exam.
82. Could you download and print (out) our new timetable?
83. Are you going / inlending / do you intend to enrol(l) on / for /
German course / course in German?
in
an inlensive / crash
84. I'll keep I have my fingers crossed for you during the exam.
85. What is the / our new lecturer like?
86- Give my regards i lovę / best to your family
lthe whole famiiy. Remembęr Ine
t0 yorrr
family.
87. Does the price of the trip include insurance? Is insurance included in the price of the trip?
88. Until /
Till when
is your passport valid? When does your passport expire?
89. Are (there) any strong painkillers available without a prescripaion? Can I buy any ...?
90. Can /May I leave a message for him? Is it possible to leave a message for him?

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