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Viagra Jaka Dawka Na Początek : We Care About Your Health!
2010 Clearspring Elementary School
Science Fair Information
April 30, 2010
Table of Contents
 
 
 
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 
Welcome
Highlights
Important Dates
Parent Dos & Don’ts
Entry Category Expectations
 
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 
Collections
Experiment
Research
 
Presentation Board Expectations
Interview Expectations
The Day of the Fair
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Appendix A – Judging Rubrics
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Collection Projects
Experiment Projects
Research Projects
 
Appendix B – Steps of the Scientific Method
 
Appendix C – Web Resources
Appendix D – Examples of good and bad presentation board layouts
 
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
2
Welcome
Welcome to the 2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair. If you have been involved with science fairs at CES in the
past, you need to know that things will be run somewhat differently this year. Please be sure to read through this packet so
that you are aware of the changes. If you are new to the science fair at CES, you won’t necessarily see the changes, but I do
hope you appreciate them. So… what are these changes?
The biggest change will be in how we recognize the students’ accomplishments. In the past, ribbons were awarded to the top 5
places in each grade. The event was a competition. While I have nothing in general against competitions I could not help but
observe that the spirit and passion of competition brought more negatives than positives to the science fair experience. The
focus was more on getting the best ranking than on the gratification brought through investigation into the world around us.
Sadly, this often resulted in tears for the students who did not receive ribbons and words spoken in anger from parents to
judges. While I cannot prove anything, I am certain (having been a judge for four years) that many of the projects submitted
were more the work of the parents than of the students. This year, students will be awarded ribbons based on their level of
satisfying the science fair objectives. It is quite possible that all students will walk away with a 1st place ribbon. It is also quite
possible they will all walk away with 3rd place or simply participation recognition. Furthermore, the judging rubric is being
distributed in this packet so that everyone will know, in advance, the exact judging criteria.
The next exciting change is the addition of a new entry category. In addition to the traditional experiment category, we will be
adding a research category. This will allow students to study a scientific question that would normally require
experimentation to answer, but whose nature would be prohibitive for an elementary school student to execute. Look for
more information about this option in this packet.
The final change will be on the night of the science fair. In addition to the opportunity for our students to show off their work to
their parents, friends, and friends’ parents, the Clearspring staff will be putting on a science expo with hands on experiences
and live demonstrations. Mrs. Williams will be heading up this effort. Please be on the lookout for more information about
this exciting new aspect of the science fair.
I have two favors to ask of everyone. 1) As always, the science fair requires the work of numerous volunteers to be a success.
We obviously need judges (ideally, we need 10-12). There are, however, plenty of other opportunities. If you can help out
(especially during the day of the fair), please contact me immediately. 2) We are making changes. I will gladly take any
constructive suggestions, but please be patient with us as we work out the kinks.
Mike Mayer
Contact: [email protected]
Online info: http://sciencefair.vmwishes.com
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
3
Highlights
 
New Judging and Recognitions
 
Judging Categories
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Scientific Approach
Presentation
Interview
Individual Recognition
 
Each entrant will receive a place award based on achievement in the 3 judging categories
 
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Judges will select one entry in the K-2 and one entry in the 3-5 age groups as “Best of Fair”
Selection will be made by consensus of all participating judges on basis of quality of the project.
New Entry Categories
 
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 
The scoring rubric is included as an appendix to this package
Best of Fair Recognition
 
 
1st Place for success in all 3 categories
2nd Place for success in 2 of the categories
3rd Place for success in 1 of the categories
Participation recognition for all honest attempts at completing a project
Collections (K-2 only)
Scientific Experimentation (K-5)
Scientific Research (K-5)  New in 2010 !
Hands-On Science Expo  New in 2010 !
 
 
Staff lead event
Mrs. Williams will provide additional information as we get closer to the Fair!
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
Important Dates
Monday,
March 22
Information Packets Available Online
Tuesday,
March 23
Information Request “Due Date”
March 27 –
April 6
Spring Break
Friday,
April 16
Project Registrations Due
Tuesday,
April 20
Tri-fold Boards Distributed
Friday,
April 30
Science Fair And Expo
Project Judging (during school day)
Students will present their projects to the judges in the gymnasium
Project Display (6:30-8:30pm)
Students and Parents (and siblings and others) may view all the exhibits on display. Results of the judging will be
available for the students to see. Best of fair entries will be on display on the "front table.” Students are
encouraged to make frequent “visits” to their project to answer questions viewers might have.
Science Expo (6:30-8:30pm)
The teaching staff will present a science expo in parallel with the display of student projects. Students and
Parents (and siblings and others) will be free to go back and forth between the project display and the expo.
Please return the information request form to your teacher OR send an email to [email protected] with all the
information requested on the registration form. Requests for information received after this date will be honored, but there is no
guarantee that it will be sent before spring break!
Information can also be downloaded from http://sciencefair.vmwishes.com
A VERY GOOD TIME TO WORK ON YOUR PROJECT
Please return the registration and project description form to your teacher OR send an email to [email protected] with
all the information requested on the form. Registrations received after this date will be allowed in the fair, but might not receive a
ribbon on the day of the fair.
All boards purchased with the registrations will be distributed to the childrens’ classrooms.
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
5
Parent Dos and Don’ts
 
Do help your child
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 
The purpose of the science fair is to allow them to
exercise creativity and critical thinking. If they are
not encouraged to dream up questions or think
through problems, they will never learn how.
Don’t do the work for them
Kids are pretty smart. They can see which projects
look good and which don’t. By helping them do the
best they can, they will be able to be proud of their
entry. Often they simply need someone to help
guide them in finding how a project can be improved.
It is the rare elementary school student that fully
appreciates working to a deadline or can visualize all
the materials they will need to complete a project.
Save everyone in your family some frustration by
helping them keep on target.
The science fair is supposed to be fun and
educational. If your child is not in charge, it won’t be
fun and they won’t learn anything.
Don’t select the topic for your child or solve all
the problems in devising the experiment.
 
Do help them manage their time and resources.
 
Don’t take over
 
This is new to them. You have more experience with
critical thinking and imagination. Use this experience
to help them learn how to work through new
problems.
Do provide critical feedback to your children to
help them improve their project.
 
 
The science fair is supposed to be fun and
educational. If your child is frustrated, it won’t be fun
and they won’t learn anything.
Do help your child formulate their questions and
think through the experiment
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It is often difficult to allow our children to learn
through trial and error. We want to see them
succeed and we do often know better than them
how to accomplish many tasks. Resist the
temptation to make that tweak here or there to help
them make it better. Let this be their project so
that they can take full pride in it.
Don’t nag your child about their progress
 
The science fair is supposed to be fun. There is no
grade. The results won’t affect their future education.
If you child is not enjoying the project, it won’t be fun
and the experience may sour, rather than attract,
your child to science.
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
6
Collection Project Expectations
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The collection category is an option available only to students in grades K-2.
 
The goal of this category is to introduce the students to the various scientific ways in which
groups of related items can be categorized so as to emphasize observable similarities and
differences between these items.
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The items collected, categorized, and displayed should be of a scientific nature
 
 
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Good subjects: rocks, leaves, shells, fossils, feathers, teeth, bones
Not-so-good subjects: dolls, stamps, coins, postcards, music
Each item (or group of identical items) should be uniquely labeled
 
 
Every item displayed must be labeled
If two or more items would be labeled identically, they must share a single common label
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The items should be displayed in logical groupings
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There is no one right way to display the items. But there should be some pattern to the display.
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Example: If you are collecting bird feathers and labeling them by species, then 3 blue jay feathers are a single item.
If, however, you are collecting bird feathers and labeling them by species and function, then 3 blue jay feathers might
be uniquely labeled as blue jay tail feather, blue jay wing feather, and blue jay breast down.
Example: If you are collecting leaves, you might choose to group them by leaf shape (needle, long/skinny, short/fat,
single lobed, multi-lobed, etc.) or you might choose to group them by native habitat (mountain, tropics, old-growth
forest, young forest, ornamental, etc.) or you might choose to group them by location where found (New England,
Pacific Northwest, Great Plains, Apalachians, etc.)
The student should understand what this pattern is when interviewed.
All collection projects will also be judged on the presentation board and interview expectations
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
7
Experiment Project Expectations
 
The experiment category is an option available to all students.
 
The goal of this category is to introduce the students to the steps involved in the scientific
method. The “correctness” of the conclusion is not as important as adhering to the scientific
method or as applying logical thought in arriving at the conclusion.
 
The project will be evaluated on the success the student demonstrates in each of the steps.
Skipping a single step does not mean that the student cannot receive a 1st place recognition,
but it does mean that the proficiency in all of the other steps has little room for sloppiness.
 
The judging criteria for each of the steps will be as follow:
 
Testable Question: Every good scientific project begins with a solid testable question. The question
should be well defined with clear potential outcomes. Also the question should demonstrate at least a
basic level of curiosity. The question should be something that interests the child. Often a weak
question can be turned into a good question with a minor tweak to the focus.
 
 
 
Examples of weak questions include, “Can I make a volcano?” “Can I make a fast pinewood derby car?” “Will a rock
fall when I drop it?” “Can I make an electromagnet?” “Can I make a battery from a potato?”
Examples of good questions include, “Does the choice of liquid I add to my volcano affect the height to which it
erupts?” “Which factor (shape, weight, or color) has the biggest affect on the speed of my pinewood derby car?”
“Does the shape or size of a rock affect how high it will bounce when dropped?” “How does the way I create the
windings affect the strength of an electromagnet?” “What type of potato gives the highest voltage in a potato
battery?”
Research: This is one of the most overlooked elements in the science fair projects I have seen in the
past. Before the student formulates a hypothesis, he or she should do some background investigation to
find out some basic facts about the testable question. Only after the student has collected some
information (and read through it) should they begin to construct a hypothesis. The research can include
personal observations, but should not be limited to this alone.
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
8
Experiment Project Expectations
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Hypothesis: This is the student’s “best guess” about what the answer to their testable question should
be based solely on the research completed in the prior step.
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(cont’d)
The hypothesis should answer the question directly. If you need to change your question to better reflect what can
or cannot be tested through experiment, now is the time to do it!
The experiment will determine if the hypothesis is correct or incorrect.
The hypothesis should not be changed if it is found incorrect. This is just as valid a scientific finding as if the
hypothesis were found to be correct!
The hypothesis does not need to say why it follows from the research, but the student should be prepared to answer
this question during the interview.
An example of a good hypothesis would be, “Yukon Gold potatoes will produce a higher voltage than either Russet
or redskin potatoes”
An example of a weak hypothesis would be, “This test will find the best potato to make a potato battery.”
Identification of Variables: Each experiment has four sets of variables. In order to design a good
experiment and have confidence in its results, all of the things that could affect the results and all of the
things that could be affected must be understood. Even if the experiment chooses not to address some
of the variables, it is essential to the analysis of the data that they be recognized as possible factors in
explaining the results.
 
Independent Variables are those things that are intentionally varied through the experimentation process.
Examples: type of potato or time into experiment
 
Dependent Variables are those things which are measured in the experiment. Example: voltage.
 
Control Variables are those things that could impact the outcome but which are not varied during the experiment.
Examples: type of metal used for the cathode and anode, temperature, length of wire
 
Uncontrolled Variables are those things which are neither controlled or measured. Ideally, these should be kept
to a minimum by identifying them early and making sure they are controlled (e.g. temperature, time of day, ambient
light, etc.). Some things may, however, simply be beyond the ability to be controlled (e.g. humidity).
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
9
Experiment Project Expectations
 
Experimental Procedure: This is the plan outlining all the steps that will be taken to carry out the
experiment.
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 
 
It should be written prior to carrying out the experiment.
It should include sufficient detail that someone else could reasonably reproduce the experiment.
It is very possible that while carrying out the experiment, it will be found that the procedure needs to be adjusted.
There are two schools of thought here when presenting the project. It is up to the student if they wish to show the
original or final procedure in the presentation. In either case, they should note somewhere that changes were made,
what they were, and why they were made.
Required Materials: This is the list of all materials needed to carry out the experiment.
 
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 
 
(cont’d)
Should be written out after completing the experimental procedure.
The list should be updated as needed to reflect actual materials used.
Again, this is to allow someone else to reproduce your experiment. Be specific!
Data Collection: This is the step where the experiment is actually carried out and the data collected.
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All measurements and observations during the execution of the experiment should be recorded.
Be sure to record all relevant information in whatever format is most logical for the experiment.
Keep all the original notes.
Unless otherwise impossible/impractical, each test should be repeated multiple times to reduce error.
No data should be discarded. If it is known to be faulty, make a note of it, but don’t delete the data point.
The presentation should include the original notes used to collect the data (or photocopy thereof). This may be in a
notebook displayed next to the board or it may be on the board itself.
If the original data are not attached to the board, a summary of the data should be included on the board.
 
Please Note: If you wish to demonstrate your experiment during the science fair, please consider the scope of the
experiment. We are not set up to “stage” events. Volcanoes and “Mentos fountains” are fun, but are impractical to
demonstrate. Having a a working potato battery at your board is a good visual aid.
 
Also Note: The science fair is not the time to carry out your experiment. There is absolutely no time to do the
data collection, analysis, or conclusion. Furthermore, the judging will already be complete.
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
10
Experiment Project Expectations
 
Analysis: This is where the student takes a look at the collected data and discusses how it pertains to
answering the original testable question.
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Students often confuse analysis with conclusion. You are not answering the testable question in this step. You are
simply looking at the evidence that will support your conclusion.
This section will often (but not always) contain graphs, tables, or both. There should be some text explaining what is
being shown in the graph/table and how it pertains to the question.
Be sure to discuss any observed trends and consistency or inconsistency in the collected data and what these might
mean for your confidence in your conclusion.
 
Conclusion: This is a very short statement (possibly a single sentence) which provides the answer to
the original testable question based on the experimental results.
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Future Work: This is a very short section where the student considers other testable questions
related to their project that might be interesting to look at in the future.
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(cont’d)
Often, while carrying out an experiment, another question will present itself naturally.
Other times, the student will need to actively think about this.
For this project, you are not expected to do anything with this other than write it down.
All experiment projects will also be judged on the presentation board and interview expectations
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
11
Research Project Expectations
 
The category is an option available to all students.
 
The goal of this category is to allow the students to research a scientific topic of their interest
that is not conducive to being studied by experimentation.
 
This is the first year this category is being offered. As such, the guidelines here may be a little
vague. Be aware that this might be either a benefit or an obstacle to each individual student.
Please discuss the possible pros/cons of the experimentation and research options with your
child to help them understand the better option for them.
 
The project will be evaluated on the success the student demonstrates in each of the
objectives. Skipping a single objective does not mean that the student cannot receive a 1st
place recognition, but it does mean that the proficiency in all of the other steps has no room
for sloppiness.
 
The judging criteria for each of the research objectives will be as follow:
 
Concise Study Question: Every good scientific project begins with a solid question. The question
should be well defined with clear research objective. The question should demonstrate at least a basic
level of curiosity. The question should be something that interests the child. Often a weak question can
be turned into a good question with a minor tweak to or refinement of the focus.
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The topic of research should be of scientific nature. This is not a biography about a scientist or a history report
about scientist’s work.
Examples of weak questions include, “Who was Marie Curie?” “How did Salk and Sabin discover the polio vaccine?”
“Did Isaac Newton really get hit by an apple?”
Examples of good questions include, “How does an eyeball create an image?” “How does DNA determine a person’s
traits?” “What is the relationship between electricity and magnetism?”
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
12
Research Project Expectations
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List of Resources: Each research project must include at least 3 resources—2 of which must be a
source other than the internet. The project may include as many sources as the student desires.
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Each entry should contain enough information for someone else to locate the material at a later date—include all
the following information (as applicable):
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Author’s Name, Name of Article or Chapter, Name of Book or Journal or Website,Volume, Page, Issue, Date, URL, Publisher
The following website explains the MLA bibliography format. While using this format will not be required, it may
make the citation process easier.
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_mla_format_examples.shtml
If your student has access to NoodleTools, (http://www.noodletools.com) this will make the work even easier
Summary of Findings: This is the “meat” of the research project. Here is where the student
summarizes information found in his or her research and discusses how it pertains to answering the
original question.
 
Be sure not to confuse the summary of findings with the conclusion. You are not answering the question in this step.
You are simply looking at the evidence that will support your conclusion.
 
This section may very well contain graphs, tables, figures or some combination thereof. There should be some text
explaining what is being shown and how it pertains to the question.
 
Conclusion: This is a very short statement (possibly a single sentence) which provides the answer to
the original question based on the research findings.
 
Future Work: This is a very short section where the student considers other researchable or testable
questions related to their project that might be interesting to look at in the future.
 
 
(cont’d)
For this project, you are not expected to do anything with this question other than to write it down.
All research projects will also be judged on the presentation board and interview expectations
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
13
Presentation Board Expectations
(all categories)
 
All three entry categories will be judged on the quality of the presentation board.
 
The goal here is that all students’ boards are clean, complete, and logically constructed.
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The boards should be aesthetically pleasing.
The boards should “tell the whole story” of the collection, experiment, or research.
The boards should “tell the story” in a logical order.
All projects must be mounted on a standard tri-fold board.
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 
Any color board may used.
The PTA will be selling them at a reduced price and may be ordered when registering for the fair.
 
 
The judges will be looking at the quality of the presentation in light of the media used
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 
The boards the PTA are selling will all be white.
Panels need not be computer generated.
Computer generated text will be held to a very different standard than labeling done by hand.
The judges criteria in evaluating the quality of the presentation board will be:
 
Logical Organization: The various elements of the project should be arranged on the tri-fold board.
in an order that leads the observer through the collection, experiment, or research in a logical order.
 
 
 
Appendix C of this package includes a number of websites which describe how to lay out a science fair project board
Appendix D of this package provides some guidance on good/bad board organizations.
Neatness: The board should not have a sloppy appearance.
 
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Computer generated text should use consistent font faces and sizes across panels.
Hand written text should be legible and the size should be roughly consistent across panels.
Deviations in font styles or handwritten appearance should be deliberate and used sparingly.
Text should be large enough that it can be read from 1’-2’ away.
Panels and panel mats should be attached firmly to the board and positioned in a balanced pattern.
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
14
Presentation Board Expectations (cont’d)
(all categories)
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Completeness: The board should cover all phases of the project.
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Clarity of Thought: The wording used should be clear and concise.
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 
 
This will mean something slightly different for each category.
All of the judging criteria for the category should be included.
Additional photographs, figures, or graphics may be included to help tell the whole story.
Rambling text is difficult to follow and makes a project difficult to understand.
Excessive text is too time consuming to absorb in a science fair venue.
A well thought out board should be able to be absorbed in under three minutes.
Use of Visual Aids: All visual aids should enhance the presentation and not distract from it.
 
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 
Visual aids may either be attached to the board or set out on the table immediately in front of the board.
Do not include anything that cannot be handled by people viewing the presentation.
No hazardous visual aids may be displayed!
No candy or snack food may be displayed as a visual aid unless it is in a sealed container. We do not want people
eating the displays. This includes “free demos.” This is an issue of safety, hygiene, and respect for other students’
work.
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
15
Student Interview Expectations
(all categories)
 
All three entry categories will be judged on the quality of the presentation board.
 
The goal here is that all students should be comfortable enough with the work they did on
their projects that they can discuss it with confidence.
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 
This is not a public speaking or speech contest. We are not looking for the most eloquent speaker.
When needed, judges will prompt the student with questions to help them gather their thoughts.
The judges’ primary concern during the interview is the best interest of the student. The questions
they ask are to help them present their projects. They are not asking questions to trick, trip-up, or
otherwise embarrass them. Please be sure that all the students understand this.
The judges criteria in evaluating the interview will be:
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 
 
 
Age appropriateness: Some projects are better suited to younger students, some are better suited
to older students. During the interview, the judge will be looking to see if the nature of the project is
suited to the student. Failures here would include both projects that are much too simplistic and
projects that are much too complicated for the student.
Understanding of the project: It is expected that the student understands the what they did while
carrying out the project. (Please see the Parents’ Dos and Don’ts list if you haven’t already done so.)
Understanding of the subject: It is expected that the student understands the science behind the
project. We are not looking for experts in a field, simply that they have a fundamental understanding of
the subject and how their project is related to it.
Ownership of the project: It is expected that the student was in charge of the project. (Again, please see
the Parents’ Dos and Don’ts page if you still haven’t already done so.)
 
Presentation of the project: It is expected that the student can (possibly with prompting) give an overall
description of the project to the judge.
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
16
The Day of the Fair
 
Who should read this?
 
 
 
If this is not your first science fair, the following information should be “old hat.” Please read anyway.
If this is your first science fair, the following may help reduce confusion about what is going on.
How are the projects judged?
 
 
 
 
Judging occurs during the school day.
Depending on the number of volunteers, 1 or 2 judges will be assigned each grade.
Students will be escorted to the gym by a PTA volunteer so that they can present their boards to the
judge or judges evaluating their entry.
The judges will ask the students various questions about the project to determine how well they
understand what he or she did and learned during this experience. As long as the student was fully in
charge of their project, this should go smoothly and will be a good experience. The intent is to allow
the students to “show off” a little with what they accomplished and for the judges to provide the
students immediate feedback about they have done well in their project and what could use
improvement. [Please let us know ahead of time if your child has an extreme case of stage fright or shyness that
would cause problems in the interview so that we can work with you to find a better means of conducting the interview
phase of the judging.]
 
What happens in the evening?
 
 
 
 
This is essentially an open house where the students, their parents, and other guests can view the work
of all of the participants.
The place recognitions and best of fair results will be revealed. Note that this will be done differently
this year. The awards will be placed on the projects after all judging is complete and before the start of
the evening program. The students will get to see how they did as soon as they enter the gym.
Students are encouraged to make frequent visits back to their own displays to answer any questions
that the visitors might have about their project.
We ask that no projects be removed before the end of the evening program.
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Appendix A
Judging Rubrics
18
Collections Judging Sheet
Scientific Approach
+
–
Presentation
+
(K-2 only)
–
Interview
Unique Labeling of All Objects
Logical Organization
Age Appropriateness
Logical Groupings
Neatness
Understanding of Project
Scientific Subject
Completeness
Understanding of Subject
Clarity of Thought
Ownership of Project
Use of Visual Aids
Explanation of Project
Satisfied 4 Objectives
Satisfied 4 Objectives
Satisfied 3 Objectives
+
–
Comments:
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Experiment Judging Sheet
Scientific Approach
+
–
Presentation
+
–
Interview
Testable Question
Logical Organization
Age Appropriateness
Research
Neatness
Understanding of Project
Hypothesis
Completeness
Understanding of Subject
Identified Variables
Clarity of Thought
Ownership of Project
Experimental Procedure
Use of Visual Aids
Explanation of Project
Satisfied 4 Objectives
Satisfied 4 Objectives
+
–
Required Materials
Data Collection
Analysis
Conclusion
Future Work
Satisfied 8 Objectives
Comments:
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Research Judging Sheet
Scientific Approach
+
–
Presentation
+
–
Interview
Concise Study Question
Logical Organization
Age Appropriateness
List of Resources (min 3)
Neatness
Understanding of Project
Summary of Findings
Completeness
Understanding of Subject
Conclusion
Clarity of Thought
Ownership of Project
Future Study Questions
Use of Visual Aids
Explanation of Project
Satisfied 4 Objectives
Satisfied 4 Objectives
Satisfied 4 Objectives
+
–
Comments:
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Appendix B
Steps of the Scientific Method
22
The Steps of the Scientific Method
 
The scientific method is a process for experimentation that is used to answer questions and explore observations.
 
Scientists use an experiment to search for cause and effect relationships in nature. In other words, they design an
experiment so that changes to one item cause something else to vary in a predictable way. These changing quantities
are called variables.Variables are a key element of the scientific method.
 
Here is an overview of the scientific method that you will need to understand in order to complete your science
fair project. Don't worry about having to learn it all at once; this is just a basic introduction to help you see the
steps of the scientific method from beginning to end. For each step, we offer a much more detailed explanation,
including examples and samples from past science fair projects.You can access the detailed explanations by clicking
on the link for the appropriate step or by using the menu on the left hand side of the screen.
 
Stating the Question: What is it that you are trying to find out from your experiment? What is it that you are trying to achieve?
 
Research Your Topic: Investigate what others have already learned about your question. Gather information that will help you
perform your experiment.
 
State Your Hypothesis: After having thoroughly researched a topic, you should have some prediction about what you think will
happen in your experiment. This educated guess concerning the outcome is called your hypothesis. You must state your hypothesis in
a way that you can readily measure.
 
Test Your Hypothesis by Doing an Experiment: Now that you have come up with a hypothesis, you need to develop a
procedure for testing whether it is true or false. This involves changing one variable and measuring the impact that this change has
on other variables. When you are conducting your experiment, you need to make sure that you are only measuring the impact of a
single change.
 
Scientists run experiments more than once to verify that results are consistent. Each time that you perform your experiment is
called a run or a trial.
 
Analyze Your Results: At this stage, you want to be organizing and analyzing the data that you have collected during the course of
your experiment in order to summarize what your experiment has shown you.
Draw Your Conclusion: This is your opportunity to explain the meaning of your results. Did your experiment support your
hypothesis? Does additional research need to be conducted? How did your experiment address your initial question and purpose?
Report Your Results and Conclusion: Since you are performing an experiment for the science fair, you will prepare a display
board so that others can share in your discoveries. In other venues, this step may include a written report as well.
 
 
 
Throughout the process of doing your project, you should keep a journal containing all of your important ideas and
information. This journal is called a laboratory notebook.
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Appendix C
Web Resources for Science Fair Projects
24
Web Resources
 
Project Ideas and Starters
 
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects
http://www.all-science-fair-projects.com
http://www.super-science-fair-projects.com
http://www.sciencefair-projects.org
http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral
Examples of Good Project Displays
 
 
 
 
 
 
http://chemistry.about.com/od/sciencefairprojects/ss/scienceposter.htm
http://sciencefair.math.iit.edu/display/layoutflow
http://www.lisanorth.org/balliyev/web/sampleboard.jpg
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/2001cssf_01sml_small.jpg
http://www.ecis.com/~d/100%20Display%20Board.jpg
http://blessedmomof5.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/img_2580.jpg
If you do not have access to these resources, please contact me through your child’s teacher or through the PTA
president so that we can discuss other means of providing your child access to example projects and displays.
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Appendix D
Examples of a Good/Bad Presentation Board Layouts
26
Example #1 – Good Layout
One of the 1st place projects from the 2009 CES Science Fair
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Example #2 – Good Layout
English is read from left to right, top to bottom. So should the layout of the text. This may seem like a simple concept,
but there have been many, many projects with total disregard to this aspect of presentation.
Here is an example of good flow. Notice how the numbered sections go along a nice, predictable pattern.
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Example #3 – Bad Layout
Here is an example of poor flow. Notice that the sections go linearly, but fail to go in a predictable pattern.
Obviously, this particular setup is highly unlikely to be chosen, but the concept goes for any variation of it.
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Example #3 – Bad Layout
This last example is just silly. There is no flow, no chronology, nothing. However, there have been
some projects like this. DON’T DO THIS!
2010 Clearspring Elementary School Science Fair
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