March 14, 2008 - Diocese of Orlando

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March 14, 2008 - Diocese of Orlando
FloridaCatholic
WWW.THEFLORIDACATHOLIC.ORG
| March 14-20, 2008
of orlando
Your Faith. Your Life. Your Community.
Many
Catholics
‘keep watch’
Holy Thursday
Priests will
be honored
at chrism
Mass
Stations of the Cross
Laura Dodson
Debra Tomaselli
Florida Catholic correspondent
Florida Catholic correspondent
An ancient tradition inspired by
Jesus’ request of the Apostles in the
Garden of Gethsemane — “Remain
here and keep watch with me” — is
very much alive in Florida. On Holy
Thursday evening, many Catholics
travel from parish to parish, visiting
the Blessed Sacrament on an altar
of repose or exposed following the
Mass of the Lord’s Supper.
“I do it every Holy Thursday —
it brings my Lent altogether,” said
Rosemary Mason, 76, a member of
St. Mary Parish in Pensacola. “After Mass at St. Mary’s, I hit the road
right away. I have spiritual music
playing in my car and I pray the entire time. Sometimes I spend only 15
minutes at each church. The sacrament is venerated in different ways
at each parish. I see some of the
same people and it always makes
me feel so good.”
The tradition Mason embraces
probably originated in Rome, where
early Christians visited seven pilgrim churches: St. John Lateran,
St. Peter’s Basilica, St. Mary Major,
St. Paul Outside the Walls, St. Lawrence Outside the Walls, Holy Crossin-Jerusalem and until the jubilee
year of 2000 St. Sebastian Outside
the Walls, which Pope John Paul II
replaced with the Sanctuary of the
Madonna of Divine Love.
Details of the practice seem to
vary from nationality to nationality,
family to family, and place to place.
For instance, the requirement that
seven be the number of churches
visited has faded for some because
of geographical realities and the
switch from morning to evening
Mass on Holy Thursday. Adoration
of the Blessed Sacrament is availPlease see THURSDAY, A7
ORLANDO — Seven priests in
the Orlando Diocese celebrating
50th and 25th jubilee years will
be honored at the chrism Mass
Wednesday, March 19, at the National Shrine of Mary, Queen of
the Universe here. All the priests
of the diocese will join Bishop
Thomas Wenski in celebration
of the Mass and will renew their
priestly commitments. Bishop
Wenski will bless the oils to be
used for sacraments in the diocese throughout the year. Mass
will begin at 11 a.m. and is open
to the public.
FATHER FELIX BAÑOS
Born: Feb. 6, 1935, Valladolid,
Spain
Ordained: June 22, 1958, in
Madrid, Spain, for the Diocese of
Palencia, Spain, by Bishop Rafael Gonzalez Maralejo, professor
of moral theology in Madrid.
Father Baños entered the
seminary, Seminario Diocesano
de Palencia, at age 11. He completed his theological studies at
Seminario Teologico HispanoAmericano in Madrid.
In March 1961, after having
served in the Diocese of Palencia, Father Baños arrived in Florida. He became associate pastor
of the Cathedral of St. James in
Orlando, Our Lady of Lourdes
in Melbourne and, in 1967, was
administrator of St. Madeleine
Sophie in High Springs, while
serving as chaplain of Spanish students at the University of
Florida in Gainesville. In 1968,
Father Baños returned to Our
Florida Catholic photos by Valeta Orlando
Above, Bishop Thomas Wenski leads the Stations of the
Cross at All Souls Parish in Sanford Feb. 29. The images
of the stations line the walls of the church. Young adults
ages 20-35 joined him to pray the stations and partake
in a Lenten meal. Themed “Into the Deep,” the evening,
sponsored by the Alive in Christ, YA2 campaign, gave the
young adults an opportunity to focus on spirituality. The
Alive in Christ capital campaign is the outgrowth of the
18-month diocesewide synod planning process.
Right, one of the youths wears a T-shirt with a Bible verse
from Galatians 2:20: “It is the Christ who lives in me.”
Please see CHRISM, A3
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Inside: Bishop: Are we hardening our hearts? A4
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Florida Catholic March 14-20, 2008
Commentary
Returning to God: the liturgies of Holy Week
Ned Kessler
Special to the Florida Catholic
While preparing the agenda for
a Holy Week liturgy last year, the
familiar melody of “Pange Lingua”
(sing my tongue) came to mind. It
resonated with something deep
inside of me, so I let it linger and savored it. Music is one example of the
many ways God calls to us through
the liturgy. He’s always calling to
us, I believe, because he wants us
to return to him. Another way God
speaks to us is through our traditions. Our curiosities about those
traditions urge us to seek answers.
Palm Sunday is called Domingo
de Ramos in Spanish-speaking
countries, and Ramos translates
to branches, not palm. I learned
that in El Ferrol, Spain, when olive
branches were blessed and distributed in a crowded plaza on a sunny
Palm Sunday morning before entering the church for Mass. One gray
Palm Sunday in Prague, I received
pussy-willow branches that had
been blessed before Mass. Those
experiences gave me a strong feeling of connection with the universal
church.
We sing and ring bells, but within
minutes, the Passion story plunges
us into the stark reality of Jesus’ suffering and death.
Everything about the Holy Thursday Mass evokes feelings of warmth
in me; even the name, “Mass of the
Lord’s Supper,” sounds warm and
inviting. The lighting feels soft, and
people maintain a reverential silence before Mass. All who attend
are there because they choose to be,
not out of any sense of obligation.
During the Exodus reading, the
Lord commands Moses and Aaron
to tell the Israelites how to eat the
Passover meal “with your loins girt,
sandals on your feet, and your staff
in hand, you shall eat like those
who are in flight. It is the Passover
of the Lord.” That reading reminds
me that we share the Old Testament
with those of the Jewish faith.
Soon we hear the Gospel story of
Jesus’ washing his disciples’ feet and
instructing them to do likewise, in a
wonderful example of service and
humility. When we recall the foot
washing in ritual action, I often
think of Pope John Paul II washing
the feet of the poorest people, and
the nobility of such acts.
Seeing the holy oils being carried
up the aisle slowly and with dignity in their beautiful glass vessels,
I recall the baptism of my youngest
grandson. I could smell the sweet
scent of sacred chrism on his forehead two days afterward when I
kissed him goodbye. I knew that
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The reflection of three priests
is seen in a decanter filled with
oil prior to the celebration of a
chrism Mass.
Our Lord would be with him all his
days.
Holy Communion is especially
meaningful to me on Holy Thursday because the sacrament was instituted at the Last Supper. The large
bowls of hosts that are consecrated
remind me of the abundance with
which Jesus is present for all who
turn to him.
After Communion, we sing
“Pange Lingua” and join in solemn
procession as the Eucharist is transferred to the tabernacle, then kneel
in adoration as the choirs sing meditative songs and the altar is stripped
without ceremony.
The Good Friday environment
feels stark and barren. Unnecessary
tion for me; everything I do that day
is done with the celebration of the
Easter Vigil in the back of my mind.
It’s my favorite liturgy of the year. I
love every element of it, starting with
the blessing of the new fire, lighting the paschal candle and singing
“Christ Our Light” as that flame
passes from person to person.
Candles are extinguished and
lights raised halfway for the Liturgy
of the Word. Our tradition is for the
choir to sing the Exodus reading,
the story of Moses, who, with outstretched hand “split the sea in two,”
allowing the Israelites to cross. I look
forward to hearing that beautiful
composition all year.
After the final reading, we sing
the Gloria, light the altar candles,
ring bells and turn the lights up full.
We can let out our joy at Jesus’ triumph over death.
The rites of initiation begin after
the homily. The elect follow the deacon to the font, as if in response to
Isaiah’s words in the third reading,
“All you who are thirsty, come to the
water!” It’s a vivid demonstration of
believers following Christ, represented symbolically by the paschal
candle. The litany of the saints,
which we sing at that time, always
takes me back to my childhood days
of singing it in Latin, to the same
melody. That melody is a part of me;
I love it. n
Kessler is the director of liturgy for St.
James Cathedral in Orlando.
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objects have been removed; organ
music is held to an absolute minimum. The altar is bare; no candles
are lit. The entrance is dramatic:
The ministers prostrate themselves
on the floor before ascending even
one altar step. Then after just a brief
prayer, we sit and listen to Isaiah’s
“suffering servant” song, one of the
most beautiful and touching readings of the liturgical year. It hurts to
hear that “he was pierced for our offenses, crushed for our sins.” Isaiah
describes a servant so much like our
Savior it staggers me to realize those
words were written more than 700
years before Christ was born. Can
anyone doubt the words were inspired by God?
During the veneration of the
cross, whether we sing or listen, I
love the songs, such as “O Sacred
Head,” “Jesus Remember Me,” and
“Ubi Caritas.” I am edified by the
various ways others have of expressing their love of Jesus while venerating. Sometimes extreme tenderness
and love is revealed in the simplest
action.
Holy Communion takes place
immediately after the veneration,
preceded by the Our Father. Even
on a day with no Mass, the church
doesn’t want us to go without the
nourishment of the body and blood
of our Savior. The ending is as simple as the entrance: After a prayer,
the ministers leave in silence and
we are left with our thoughts.
Holy Saturday is a day of expecta-
Your Orlando community
March 14-20, 2008 www.thefloridacatholic.org
A3
CHRISM
From A1
Lady of Lourdes in Melbourne until
1971, when he became the first pastor of St. Patrick Parish in Mount
Dora. In 1976, he became pastor of
Orlando’s then-newest church, St.
Joseph, arriving in time for the dedication. He was pastor of Holy Spirit
Parish in Lake Wales from 1984 until his retirement in 2000.
His name, Felix, means happy
and fortunate, and he feels both.
“Christ promised to be with us
always until the end of time,” he
said. “Keep that in mind and you
are never alone.”
He assists at St. Joseph Parish in
Lakeland and Holy Spirit Parish in
Lake Wales.
FATHER DAVID PAGE
Born: June 10, 1932, Galway, Ireland
Ordained: June 8, 1958, at St.
Mary’s Cathedral in Kilkenny, Ireland, for the Diocese of St. Augustine
Father Page attended Mungret
College in Limerick, and completed
his theological studies at St. Keiran’s
College, Kilkenny, Ireland. After he
was ordained, Father Page came to
Florida.
St. Petersburg was his first stop,
where he served as assistant pastor of St. John Parish and taught at
Bishop Barry High School. The following year, he transferred to Christ
the King Parish and Bishop Kenny
High School in Jacksonville.
In 1962, he earned a master’s degree in U.S. history at The Catholic
University of America in Washington before becoming vice president
of Father Lopez High School in
Daytona Beach. From there, Father
Page founded Epiphany Parish in
Port Orange, where he was pastor
until 1966. In addition to serving at
St. Mary Magdalen Parish in Altamonte Springs, the Cathedral of St.
James in Orlando and finally Holy
Name of Jesus Parish in Indialantic, Father Page was also executive
editor of the Florida Catholic from
1965-1990. He became pastor of
Holy Name of Jesus Parish in 1987,
where he remains today.
Father Page’s priesthood, which
includes Vatican II changes and the
building of four churches under his
leadership, has given him an appreciation of laity. “We can’t do it without the Lord and the people’s help,”
he said.
FATHER THOMAS
JOSEPH CONNERY
FATHER DAVID
PAGE
John Bosco Parish in Marrero, La.,
then taught at nearby Archbishop
Shaw High School from 1984-1986.
The following year he relocated to
Florida, where he became associate
pastor at Queen of Peace Parish in
New Port Richey, serving until 1990,
then at Prince of Peace in Ormond
Beach for three years.
He earned a master’s degree in
education at the University of South
Florida in 1994 and a doctorate in
counseling from the University of
Florida in Gainesville in 2002. “You
grow more through different experiences,” he said.
He returned to education, this
time at Father Lopez High School
in Daytona Beach from 1994-1998,
before becoming associate pastor
of Holy Name of Jesus Parish in Indialantic. Since 2003, he has served
as pastor of St. Peter Parish in DeLand.
“People are looking for life,” he
said. “They want the joy and energy of following the Lord, doing his
work.” The thought he carries with
him originates in John 10:10. “‘I
have come that they may have life,
and have it abundantly.’ That’s my
prayer.”
FATHER BENEDICT
ANDRZEJ JURKIEWICZ
(Discalced Carmelites)
Born: July 20, 1957, Siemianowice, Silesia, Poland
Ordained: June 11, 1983, by
Bishop Julian Groblicki in Krakow,
Poland
Father Jurkiewicz attended Carmelite Seminary in Krakow, Poland,
and earned his master of theology
degree at Catholic University of Lublin, Poland.
After ordination, Father Jurkiewicz served as catechist in Krakow
for a year, then became vice principal and prefect of students at Minor
Carmelite Seminary at Wadowice,
Poland, until 1990. He became the
superior of the Carmelite Monastery in Lodz, Poland, and in 1992
came to the Carmelite Monastery
in Munster, Ind. Nearly six months
later, he was asked to help minister to the Polish congregations in
Florida. Assigned to the Carmelite
Community in Flagler County, he
began celebrating Polish Masses in
the Diocese of Orlando in 1993.
In 2002, he was asked to commute weekly to Orlando to celebrate Polish Mass. He thought the
assignment would last two or three
months, but he made the 100-mile
trek each weekend for two years.
“When there is no place to cel-
FATHER
THOMAS
CONNERY
FATHER
BENEDICT
JURKIEWICZ
ebrate the Mass in a particular
language, then it becomes like missionary work,” he said. “It’s not exactly like Africa, but the work of a
priest is missionary work.”
Finally, in 2004, he moved to Orlando when he was named parochial vicar of St. Joseph Parish, where
he remains today. But it didn’t end
his missionary zeal. In addition to
his responsibilities at St. Joseph, Father Jurkiewicz travels to All Souls
Parish in Sanford each weekend,
where he celebrates the Latin Tridentine Mass.
FATHER NICHOLAS
JOHN O’BRIEN
Born: April 17, 1956, Cleveland
Ordained: Sept. 17, 1983, at St.
Martin of Tours, Cleveland, by Bishop A. Edward Pevec
Father O’Brien attended Sts.
Peter and Paul High School Seminary in Newark, Ohio, run by the
Pontifical Institute for Foreign Missions and Maryglade Seminary at
the University of Detroit. In 1983,
he completed studies at Catholic
Theological Union in Chicago.
After ordination, Father O’Brien
served as director of vocations for
the Pontifical Institute for Foreign
Missions in Fraser, Mich., and, later,
in Newark, Ohio, where he returned
to teach at Sts. Peter and Paul High
School Seminary.
But the experience that shaped
his priesthood occurred during a
mission trip to New Guinea, an island nation north of Australia, in
1986. “I thought I would change
the lives of those I helped,” he said,
“but I discovered that the faith of
the people was much stronger than
mine.”
Father O’Brien returned, focused
on becoming a diocesan priest and
sending others on missions. In
1990, he became parochial vicar
at Blessed Trinity Parish in Ocala,
then Resurrection Parish in Lakeland, and St. Paul Parish in Leesburg. Through the years, he established mission teams that traveled
to Mexico, the Appalachian region
of the United States and the Dominican Republic.
He is pastor of St. Anthony Parish
in Lakeland.
Father O’Brien believes we are
here to serve others. “It’s stewardship,” he said. “You give to God and
he gives back to you.”
FATHER
NICHOLAS
JOHN O’BRIEN
FATHER BRIAN
SHERIDAN
Conn.
Ordained: May 28, 1983, in Ipswich, Mass., by Bishop Alfred
Hughes
Father Sheridan earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and
history from Merrimack College in
North Andover, Mass., before attending La Salette Novitiate in Altamont, N.Y., and Washington Theological Union in Silver Spring, Md.,
where he graduated with a master’s
degree in theology.
“My experience of Eucharist is always a sense of miracle,” said Father
Sheridan. “I love every opportunity
to celebrate Mass.”
His ministry began at St. Ann
Catholic Church in Marietta, Ga.,
before he traveled to Bolivia in
1989 with the Maryknoll Language
School, then served in Argentina.
Four years later, he returned to the
United States, where he became
mission fundraiser in Hartford for
six years.
He served a short stint as shrine
director of Our Lady of La Salette in
Altamont, N.Y., before being asked
to serve as pastor of Good Shepherd
Parish in Orlando, with its bilingual
needs. He might not have accepted
the invitation, had it not been for a
border of Disney characters surrounding the room he was in and
the Mickey Mouse telephone he was
using while talking to the superior
of his religious order.
He became pastor of Good Shepherd Parish in 1997, where he remains today. “This is a superb place
to meet Christ and serve Christ,” he
said. “It’s alive.”
FATHER ANDRZEJ
(ANDREW) WOJTAN
Born: Dec. 3, 1954, Warsaw, Poland
Ordained: May 29, 1983, for
Archdiocese of Warsaw, Poland, by
Cardinal Joseph Glemp
Father Wojtan grew up in Poland,
where almost everyone was Catholic. While studying engineering in
FATHER
ANDRZEJ
WOJTAN
40th ANNIVERSARY
Five priests in the Diocese of
Orlando are celebrating 40 years
of priesthood this year and will be
noted at the chrism Mass March
19. They are: Redemptorist Father
Francis Browne, pastor, Sacred Heart
Parish, New Smyrna Beach; Father
Paul Henry, pastor, St. John Vianney
Parish, Orlando; Father Peter Henry,
pastor, St. Ann Parish, DeBary;
Father Tito Nel Rojas, parochial vicar,
All Souls Parish, Sanford; and Father
Richard Walsh, pastor, St. Margaret
Mary Parish, Winter Park.
Germany, he was surprised by the
lack of Catholic churches. Maybe
they have no priests, he thought,
and, suddenly, he considered the
vocation. After earning a master’s
degree in engineering at the University of Germany in 1978, he completed a master’s degree in moral
theology from the Archdiocesan
Seminary of Warsaw.
Father Wojtan served locally until
1987 when, after Pope John Paul II’s
visit to Poland, he volunteered to assist where needed. He was chosen to
go Zambia, Africa, where he served
the Diocese of Mbala for eight years.
After a short stint in Germany, he
was reassigned to South Africa,
and served there until 2003, when
health issues began to plague him.
He returned to Poland, serving the
Pontifical Mission Societies. While
there, he heard that the Diocese of
Orlando needed priests.
Before he could even locate it on
a map, Father Wojtan found himself
headed for St. Isaac Jogues Parish in
Orlando in 2004, and then, in 2006,
the Cathedral of St. James. In 2008,
he became parochial administrator
of Holy Spirit Parish in Mims, where
he remains today.
His vocation is grounded in
Christ’s encouragement to “Feed
my sheep” (Jn 21:17). “Despite my
own shortcomings,” Father Wojtan
said, “God still wants to use me and
sends me to preach.” n
FATHER BRIAN
SHERIDAN
(La Salette Fathers)
Born: Oct. 8, 1954, Hartford,
ORL A3
9567
Born: Nov. 20, 1954, Queens,
N.Y.
Ordained: May 21, 1983, Columbus, Ohio, by Bishop James A. Griffin
Father Connery earned his bachelor’s degree at Don Bosco College
in Newton, N.J., and a master of divinity at Pontifical College Josephinum in Columbus.
He began his priesthood at St.
FATHER FELIX
BAÑOS
A4
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Vol. 69, No. 17
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407-373-0087
Are we shutting out Jesus
by hardening our hearts?
In the prophet Isaiah’s account of convenience, my will, my honor
the Suffering Servant, he says: “By to Christ’s, I answer the question:
his stripes, we were healed.”
“Yes, it is I.”
As we contemplate the image of
But, if Jesus dies because of us, he
Jesus, beaten, tortured, dying on also dies for us. “By his stripes, we
the cross — an image repare healed.” What was in
resented so graphically in
essence that disease that
Mel Gibson’s “The Passion
required so drastic a cure?
of the Christ” a couple of
We all know the disease
years ago — we must ask
called arteriosclerosis —
ourselves: If this was the
hardening of the arteries.
cure, then what was the
Perhaps, we could call
disease? And, of course,
the disease from which
unless we recognize the
we suffered and for which
FROM THE
disease — and recognize
Jesus suffered and died to
BISHOP
ourselves as diseased —
save us, “cardiosclerosis”
we will not understand
— hardening of the heart.
Thomas
the two major catechetical
Scriptures do not use this
Wenski word, of course, but we find
lessons of Holy Week: that,
first of all, he died because
its equivalents in Scripture:
of us, because of our sins;
Ezekiel talks of “hearts of
but more importantly, that he died stone,” Jeremiah speaks of the “unfor us.
circumcised heart,” and Moses in
At the Last Supper, when Jesus the Book of Deuteronomy just calls
announced his betrayal, all the it “stubbornness of heart.”
apostles asked Jesus, “Is it I, Lord?”
“Cardiosclerosis,” we could say,
And, the Passion will remain extra- is a genetic disease. We inherit it
neous to us unless we acknowledge from our first parents, Adam and
that this suffering and death of Je- Eve. They said “No” to God and his
sus was our own work. We have to will. That original sin represented a
make the question raised by the turning away from God, a shutting
apostles our own — but, in doing out of God from the heart by buildso, we have to answer it ourselves: ing stone walls of self-will. And
I am Judas who betrays, I am Peter while that “cardiosclerosis” can be
who denies, the crowd that shouts, said to be in our genes, as it were, it
“Barabbas, not him.” Every time I is aggravated by our own “lifestyle”
have preferred my satisfaction, my choices — the times which we have
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ratified that “No” with our own sins.
And indeed this is what hardness of
heart represents in Scripture: the refusal to submit to God, to love him
with one’s whole heart, to obey his
law.
In the Scriptures, the heart is the
seat of the interior life, the heart
represents man’s most profound
“I,” his very self — his intelligence
and will. The heart is the center of
the religious life, the point where
God speaks to us and we decide our
response to God. When Jesus died
on Calvary, the Gospels tell us how
the veil of the Temple was rent. And,
this Passiontide, this Holy Week,
is about tearing open our hearts,
breaking the stones that encircle
the heart that keep us from saying
“Yes” to God.
Jesus dies for us. He is truly man
— his obedience makes up for the
disobedience of our first parents:
The Garden of Gethsemane redeems, as it were, the Garden of
Eden. The human fear and treachery of Adam and Eve meet the human trust, love and obedience of
Jesus of Nazareth whom God calls
his beloved one.
From the Old Testament times,
the People of God repeated the
psalmist’s prayer: “Create in me, O
God, a new heart.” And, of course,
this is why Jesus died — to give us
that new heart. That heart can only
be ours through our sharing in his
Passion, though our own dying and
rising with him from sin to the new
life of grace that is the fruit of Baptism.
This week, we are called to be
with Jesus on Calvary — and, as we
contemplate his Passion, his death,
may that earthquake that shook the
earth around Jerusalem and caused
the veil of the Temple to be torn
also tear at our hearts, breaking its
stones, overcoming the “cardiosclerosis” of our human condition. Then,
the cross of Christ will no longer appear to us as “folly and scandal” but,
on the contrary, as “strength of God
and wisdom of God.” The cross becomes not an instrument of torture,
but a reason for our certainty, the
supreme proof of the love of God for
us. With a new heart formed within
the pierced heart of Christ himself
we can say with St. Paul: “Far be
from me to glory except in the cross
of Our Lord Jesus Christ.” n
Remember to attend the Festival of Faith — May 8-10, Orange
County Convention Center, South
Concourse, International Drive,
off I-4, Orlando — celebrating the
Diocese of Orlando’s 40th anniversary and the “Year of Evangelization.” For more information,
visit the Web site: www.festivaloffaith.org.
Soon-to-be Catholics reflect on spiritual blindness
Laura Dodson
EXECUTIVE & EDITORIAL STAFF:
Parish Services Manager: Mary St. Pierre,
[email protected]
Office Manager: Pat Spencer,
[email protected]
Layout Editor: Ann Borowski Slade,
[email protected]
Projects Editor: Jean Palombo-Gonzalez,
[email protected]
Florida Catholic March 14-20, 2008
Florida Catholic correspondent
OVIEDO — As her name sounded from the ambo, Cheryl Drohan
stood in the midst of the church and
said, “Present.”
At the 8:30 a.m. Mass at Most
Precious Blood Parish in Oviedo,
Drohan joined three other soon-tobe Catholics from her parish for the
celebration of the scrutinies, rites
that help the elect to examine communally the spiritual blindness in
their lives in preparation for the
sacraments of initiation they will
experience at the Easter vigil. Three
scrutinies are celebrated at Masses
on the third, fourth, and fifth Sundays of Lent.
“We’re not there to be scrutinized
by the parish, but we must scrutinize ourselves. It’s about what we
all are or should be doing,” Drohan
The Florida Catholic (ISSN 0746-4584) publishes 38 issues/year (weekly from October
through mid-May, except for the weeks of Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s;
biweekly the rest of the year) for the Archdiocese of Miami and the Dioceses of Orlando, Palm Beach, Pensacola-Tallahassee, St. Petersburg, and Venice for $24 per year
in Florida, $30 per year in the U.S., and $95 per year foreign, by The Florida Catholic
FYI
Godparents or sponsors are fully
initiated, active Catholics. The Catechism of the Catholic Church
states “...the godfather and
godmother... must be firm believers,
able and ready to help the newly
baptized — child or adult — on the
road of Christian life.”
said.
“The elect” is the name given
those catechumens who have celebrated the rite of election on the
First Sunday of Lent and are called
to the Easter sacraments of initiation. More than 500 elect in the Diocese of Orlando participated in the
second scrutiny rite on the Fourth
Sunday of Lent, March 2. The second scrutiny concerns the parable
of the man born blind (Jn 9: 1-41),
and challenges catechumens to
consider the paradox of blindness
to sin.
Drohan had put off participation in the Christian initiation of
adults because of her concern for
the release of her emotions — she
cries when she is overwhelmed, but
“today was very calm, soothing. Instead of worrying about being emotional, I was able to see others smiling and encouraging me,” she said.
Several candidates came to
the church in support of the elect.
Candidates are already-baptized
Christians journeying to celebrate
full communion with the church
on the vigil of Pentecost, held this
year at the Festival of Faith, Saturday, May 10, 5 p.m., at the Orange
County Convention Center.
“I feel like I have a family within
a family, within a family,” Drohan
explained. “Our little group of elect
is my family, then we add the can-
Inc., 50 E. Robinson St., Suite G, Orlando, FL 32801-1619. Publisher reserves the right
to refuse advertisements contrary to paper’s policy and standards in Catholic Press
Association. The appearance of advertising in these pages does not imply endorsement of businesses, services and products. Complaints regarding advertising should
be made directly to the advertiser or to your local Better Business Bureau. Readers
ORL A4
didates who are journeying with us
and that’s my extended family and
then there’s our big church family.”
The elect were dispersed with
their sponsors throughout the
community so that everyone could
be better engaged in the rite. As she
knelt for prayers, she said she felt
supported by her sponsor’s hand on
her shoulder and was aware of those
nearby who, obviously moved, were
crying.
Drohan’s sponsor, Debbie Pulliam, came into the church in 1972.
“I had thought about being a
sponsor before, but I always had
a reason why I couldn’t do it. This
time I didn’t have a reason and we’ve
clicked. We’ve gotten together after
church and we like to be together
as a family — we’ve developed a
friendship that goes beyond the
Please see REFLECT, A20
must exercise prudence in responding to advertising in all media. Political advertising
not accepted. Periodicals postage paid at Orlando, FL 32862 and additional mailing
offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Catholic, P.O. Box 4993,
Orlando, FL 32802-4993. Member, Catholic Press Association; subscriber to Catholic
News Service (CNS).
around Your community
March 14-20, 2008 www.thefloridacatholic.org
PARISH EVENTS
Annual fish fry dinner: March
14, 5-7 p.m., Blessed Trinity Parish
center, Orlando. Sponsored by
Blessed Trinity Men’s Club. Menu
includes fried grouper, cole slaw,
corn fritters, beans, dessert and
soft drinks. Advance tickets: $7,
adults; $3, children under 10,
available at parish office. At the
door: $9 adults; $4 children under
10. Call Mike Taylor, 407-497-5855.
Lenten fish fry dinners:
Fridays, through March 14, 4-8
p.m., St. Anthony Parish center,
Lakeland. Cost: $6, includes fried
fish, two side dishes, dessert
and beverages. Clam chowder,
shrimp and takeout available. Call
863-858-8047.
Annual Seder meal: March
18, 6:30 p.m., St. Mary Magdalen
Parish life center, Altamonte
Springs. Sponsored by St. Robert
and St. Anne Circles, includes a reenactment of the Hebrew Passover
festival. Tickets: $20. Call the Parish
Office 407-831-1212.
Easter concert: March 28,
7 p.m., Our Saviour Parish,
Cocoa Beach. Bob Hurd, teacher,
composer and liturgist, will
join the Our Saviour choir and
instrumentalists. Tickets: $10 in
advance, available after weekend
Masses and at the parish office;
$15 at the door.
Pro-life rally: April 11, 6 p.m.,
Queen of Peace Parish, State
Road 200, 3 miles south of I-75,
Ocala. Judie Brown, founder and
president of American Life League,
will speak at banquet. Tickets:
$15; limited. Contact: Mabel
Ryan, 352-854-8892, or [email protected]
embarqmail.com.
CONFERENCES/
MEETINGS/
OTHER EVENTS
Loyola University education
information sessions: March
27 and April 3, 6 p.m., Our
Lady of Hope Parish office,
4675 S. Clyde Morris Blvd., Port
Orange. Distance education
programs for master’s degree or
PRAYER SESSIONS/
MASSES
CCTN
A ministry of
St. Paul’s Catholic
Church in Leesburg
Living Stations of the Cross:
March 14, 7:30 p.m., St. John
Vianney Parish, Orlando; March
21, 7:30 p.m., St. Thomas Aquinas
Parish, St. Cloud. The one-hour
meditative program includes 45
people in a live re-creation of
the historic Stations of the Cross,
helping make them relevant
to today. Free. Doris Hunt,
407-855-5054.
Haitian-Creole Mass: Sundays,
9 a.m., Robinswood Middle School,
6305 Balboa Drive, Orlando.
Sponsored by St. Andrew Parish.
Adoration of the Blessed
Sacrament: Monday through
Saturday, 7:10 a.m. until start
of 8:30 a.m. Mass, and Monday
through Friday from 9 a.m. to
noon; first Sundays, noon-6 p.m.,
Chapel of Our Lady of the Angels;
rosary for vocations daily following
Mass, St. Brendan Parish, 1000
Oceanshore Blvd., Ormond Beach.
386-441-1505.
Pray rosary for life: Third
and fifth Saturdays, 7 a.m.,
abortion facility on Lucerne
Terrace in downtown Orlando.
St. Augustine’s Respect Life
Committee invites fellow Catholics
to join them in praying the rosary.
407-699-4328.
Sunday Afternoon
with CCTN
The Catholic Community
Television Network (CCTN)
Catholic programming 2-4:30 p.m.
every Sunday on WTGL-TV 45
Schedule for Sunday, March 16
2-3 p.m.
3-3:30 p.m.
3:30-4 p.m.
4-4:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass
Vatican Weekly News
Christopher Closeup
Live With Passion
Other available viewing channels
Bright House, Cox
and Prime Cable .............................Channel 19
ONGOING
MEETINGS
Direct TV ...............................................Channel 45
Comcast ................................................Channel 17
Heathrow Cable..............................Channel 66
Decca Cable.........................................Channel 15
12536
If you would like to donate to this ministry, our
address is 1330 Sunshine Ave., Leesburg, FL 34788
certificate in religious education
or pastoral studies. Contact:
Nannine Dahlen, 386-441-7878, or
[email protected]
The Helpers of God’s Precious
Infants prayer vigil: Usually first
Saturdays at different parishes.
Each vigil begins with Mass,
followed by rosary procession to
nearby abortion site. March 22,
Holy Saturday (fourth Saturday),
9 a.m., morning prayer, Cathedral
of St. James, with Bishop Thomas
Wenski. Sponsored by diocesan
Office of Advocacy and Justice.
Contact: 407-246-4819 or
[email protected]diocese.org.
Retrouvaille program:
March 28-30, San Pedro Center,
Winter Park. This program is for
couples in troubled marriages.
For information or registration,
call 407-977-8136. Information is
confidential.
Festival of Faith: May 8-10,
Orange County Convention Center,
South Concourse, International
Drive, off I-4, Orlando. Celebrates
the Diocese of Orlando’s 40th
anniversary and the “Year of
Evangelization.” Free. For more
information, www.festivaloffaith.
org.
Msgr. Bishop Knights of
Columbus Council 2112: Regular
business meeting, first Mondays,
8 p.m., at the council hall, 5727
Cornelia Ave., Orlando. Rosary,
7:30 p.m. Meeting is open to all
Knights who have taken their first
degree. Contact: Grand Knight Bill
Mazanec, 407-678-2112.
St. Patrick Knights of
Columbus Assembly 2883:
Regular business meeting, second
Mondays, 7:30 p.m., Annunciation
Parish family life center, Fireplace
Room, 1020 Montgomery Road,
Altamonte Springs. Meeting is
open to all fourth-degree Knights.
ORL A17
A17
ORLANDO DIOCESE COMMUNITY PAGE
SUBMISSION DEADLINES
The Florida Catholic welcomes calendar items of coming events for your
parish or organization. Due to time required for production and mailing, we
need to receive items at least five weeks before requested publication. Send
items to: Around Your Community, Florida Catholic, P.O. Box 1800, Orlando,
FL 32802-1800; by fax, send items marked Around Your Community to
407-246-4942; or e-mail to, [email protected]
Announcements for ongoing activities will be removed after 60 days. For
continued coverage, announcements must be resubmitted.
Contact: Faithful Navigator
Bob Nettles, 407-297-1852, or
[email protected]
Knights of Columbus St.
Joseph Council 7408: Regular
business meeting, second and
fourth Thursdays, 7:30 p.m.,
Knights of Columbus, Babcock
Street, Palm Bay. All local and/
or visiting Knights are welcome
to attend. Call Grand Knight Bob
Burgess, 321 537-5240.
Catholic War Veterans: Father
John Washington Post 1944,
second Saturdays, 10 a.m., Prince
of Peace Parish, Gold Room, 600
S. Nova Road, Ormond Beach.
All Catholic men and women
who have served honorably in
the armed forces of the United
States are invited to join. Gene
Swarbrick, 386-255-3814, or e-mail
[email protected]
yahoo.com.
Catholic War Veterans of
Lakeland: Bishop Charles B.
McLaughlin Memorial Post 1917,
third Mondays, 6:30 p.m., St.
Joseph Parish hall, 210 W. Lemon
St., Lakeland. All Catholic men
and women who have served
honorably in the armed forces of
the United States are invited to
join. Spouses are welcome. Dinner
follows. Steve Jones, 863-688-8787,
or e-mail [email protected]
earthlink.net.
SECULAR
COMMUNITIES
Lay Carmelites, St. James:
First Saturdays, begins with Mass
at 8 a.m., followed by meeting
and spiritual development until
11:30 a.m., St. James Cathedral,
215 N. Orange Ave., Orlando.
Contact: Kathleen Richardville,
407-898-3902.
Lay Carmelites, St. Therese
of the Child Jesus: Fourth
Saturdays, begins with Mass at 9
a.m., followed by meeting and
spiritual development, Ascension
Parish, 2950 N. Harbor City Blvd.,
Melbourne. Contact: Agatha
Bobitka, TOC, 321-253-2833.
Lay Carmelites, St. Therese
Community 1015: Fourth
Tuesdays, 10 a.m. after Mass and
Benediction, St. Vincent de Paul
Parish, 5323 E. County Road 462,
Wildwood. Contact: Mary Dillon,
TOC, 352-259-4198.
Lay Carmelites: For
information about other
communities throughout the
Diocese of Orlando, contact Steve
Riddle, regional coordinator,
407-855-9954.
Secular Franciscan Order,
Lady Poverty Fraternity: First
and third Tuesdays, begins with
evening prayer at 7 p.m., Mary,
Mother of God Chapel, San Pedro
Spiritual Development Center,
2400 Dike Road, Winter Park.
Meeting follows. Contact: Dan
Hardester, SFO, [email protected]
yahoo.com.
Secular Franciscan Fraternity:
Fourth Saturdays, 10 a.m., Queen
of Peace Parish hall, Ocala. Secular
Franciscans commit themselves
by promise, not vow, to live the
Gospel life of Jesus Christ in
the spirit of St. Francis of Assisi.
352-854-5647 or 352-793-7071.
Secular Franciscan Order, St.
Francis Fraternity: First Sundays,
12:30 p.m., St. Francis of Assisi
Parish, Building B, 834 S. Orange
Blossom Trail, Apopka. Call Jeane
Fwaynos, SFO, 407-869-6716.
Secular Franciscan Fraternity,
Little Flowers of St. Francis:
Second Saturdays, following the
8:30 a.m. Mass, Epiphany Parish,
parish house 5, 201 Lafayette St.,
Port Orange. Peg, 386-677-7089.
Secular Order of the Servants
of Mary (Servite), Mary, Queen
of the Servants Community:
Second Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.,
Our Lady of Grace Parish center,
300 Malabar Road, Palm Bay.
Laypeople who promise to live
the Gospel life, especially the
Servite charisms of social justice,
compassion and hospitality, using
the life of Mary as example.
Contact: Phil Borsik, SOSM,
321-728-0509.
Secular Order of the Servants
of Mary (Servite), Our Lady of
Sorrows Community: Second
Fridays, 9:30 a.m., St. Timothy
Parish ministry building, Lady Lake.
Secular Servites are laypeople who
commit themselves by promise to
live the Gospel life of Jesus Christ,
and to deepen the knowledge
and acts of devotion to Mary and
extend her presence to the whole
world. Contact: Donald Siple,
SOSM, 352-750-4877.
Secular Order of the
Servants of Mary, St. Peregrine
Community: Second Saturdays,
10:30 a.m., St. Catherine of Siena
Parish, St. Peregrine Room, 2750
E. Osceola Parkway, Kissimmee.
Contact: Adriana Bentum-Tilus,
SOSM, 407-288-3701.
Secular Franciscan Fraternity,
San Damiano: St. Mark Parish,
Highway 42, Summerfield.
Contact: Kathryn Hampel, SFO,
352-750-6334.
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
JMJ Life Center seeks
volunteers due to an expansion
of services. Opportunities exist
for experienced ultrasound
technicians, Internet/telephone
solicitation of supplies, IT support,
data entry, pickup and delivery
of donations, accounting,
fundraising, development director,
committee managers, a handyman
and a cleaning person. Some of the
positions can be done from home
on your schedule for as little as one
hour per week. Call 407-839-0620
or visit www.jmjlifecenter.org.
A18
advertisement
Florida Catholic March 14-20, 2008
Holy WeekSchedules
Altamonte
Springs
■ St. Mary Magdalen
861 Maitland Ave.
407-831-1212
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 14, 7:15-8:15
p.m.; March 15, 3-4 p.m., 6-6:45 p.m.
(Spanish); March 17, 11-noon, 7-8
p.m.; March 18, 11-noon; March 19,
7-8 p.m.; March 20, 11-noon; March
21, 11-noon
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m. (bilingual)
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
6:30 a.m., 8 a.m., 10 a.m., 10:15 a.m.,
noon, 2 p.m. (Spanish)
Apopka
■ St. Francis of Assisi
834 S. Orange Blossom Trail
407-886-4602
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
6 p.m., 8:15 p.m. (Spanish)
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7 p.m. (Spanish)
EASTER VIGIL
5 p.m. (Spanish), 8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
8 a.m. (English), 8 a.m. (Spanish), 10
a.m. (English), noon (Spanish), 1:30
p.m. (Kreyole), 2 p.m. (Spanish)
Cocoa
■ Blessed Sacrament
5135 N. Cocoa Ave
321-632-6333
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
DeBary
■ St. Ann
26 Dogwood Trail
386-668-8270
RECONCILIATION
Penance Services: March 18, 7-8
p.m.
Confessions: March 14, 7-9 p.m.;
March 15, 9-3:30 p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
6 a.m., 8 a.m., 11 a.m.
Deltona
Lakeland
Mims
■ St. Clare
■ Resurrection
■ Holy Spirit
RECONCILIATION
RECONCILIATION
RECONCILIATION
2961 Day Road
386-789-9990
Confessions: March 15, 3:15-3:45
p.m. (bilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m. (trilingual — English, Spanish,
Kreyole)
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
9 a.m., 11:30 a.m, noon, 3 p.m., 5 p.m.
(Spanish), 7 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m. (trilingual)
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
6:30 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m. (Spanish),
10:30 a.m., noon (Spanish)
Eustis
■ St. Mary of the Lakes
218 Ocklawaha Ave.
352-483-3500
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 22, 3-4 p.m.
(bilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m. (bilingual)
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
2:30 p.m., 7 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m., 12:15
p.m. (bilingual)
Kissimmee
■ Holy Redeemer
1603 N. Thacker Ave.
407-847-2500
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 17, 8-9 a.m.,
9:30-10:30 a.m., 7:30-8:30 p.m. (all
services bilingual); March 18, 8-9
a.m., 9:30-10:30 a.m., 7:30-8:30 p.m.
(all services bilingual); March 19,
8-9 a.m. (bilingual); March 20, 8-9
a.m. (bilingual); March 21, 11-noon
(bilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7:30 p.m. (bilingual)
3720 Old Highway 37
863-646-3556
Penance Service: March 18, 7:30-9
p.m.
Confessions: March 15, 9 a.m.-3:30
p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7:30 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER VIGIL
7:30 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
8 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 10:45 a.m., 12:30
p.m. (Spanish)
■ St. Anthony
820 Marcum Road
863-858-8047
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
noon, 3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7 a.m., 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m.
(Spanish), 6 p.m.
Melbourne
Beach
■ Immaculate Conception
3780 S. A-1-A
321-725-0552
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 22, 11-noon
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
7:30 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7 a.m. (Ocean Park), 9 a.m., 11 a.m.
Merritt Island
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
■ Divine Mercy
EASTER VIGIL
RECONCILIATION
9 a.m., 10 a.m. (bilingual), 3 p.m., 7:30
p.m. (bilingual)
8 p.m., 8 p.m. (Spanish)
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., noon, 1:30
p.m. (Spanish)
■ St. Catherine of Siena
2750 E. Osceola Parkway
407-344-9607
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 15, 2-3:45 p.m.
(trilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
1940 N. Courtenay Parkway
321-452-5955
Penance Services: March 17, 10-11
a.m., 7-8 p.m.
Confessions: March 21, 10-11 a.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
7 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
6 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m.,
noon
2309 Holder Road
321-269-2282
Confessions: March 15, 3-3:45 p.m.;
March 16, 7:45-8:15 a.m., 10-10:45
a.m.; March 21, 8:30-9 a.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
6 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m.
Mount Dora
■ St. Patrick
6803 Old Highway 441 S.
352-383-8556
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 15, 10-3:30
p.m., 11-1 p.m. (bilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m. (bilingual)
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
4 p.m., 7 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER VIGIL
7:30 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:30
p.m. (Spanish)
Orlando
■ Holy Cross
12600 Marsfield Ave./Corner of
John Young Parkway and Deerfied
407-438-0990
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 15, 3:30-4:30
p.m., 6-7 p.m. (Spanish); March 16, 6-7
p.m. (bilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
5:30 p.m. (Spanish), 7:30 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
noon (Spanish), 3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
9 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
6:30 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., 12:30 p.m. (Spanish), 5 p.m., 7
p.m. (Spanish)
■ St. James Cathedral
215 N. Orange Ave.
407-422-2005
RECONCILIATION
Penance Service: March 15, 9
a.m.-3 p.m. (bilingual)
Confessions: March 17, 18 and 19,
11:15 a.m.-noon (bilingual); March 20,
noon (bilingual); March 21, 1:30 p.m.
(bilingual); March 22, 2 p.m. (bilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7:30 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7:30 p.m. (Spanish)
7 p.m. (trilingual)
EASTER VIGIL
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
8 p.m. (bilingual)
9 a.m., noon (Spanish), 3 p.m., 6 p.m.
(French), 7:30 p.m. (trilingual), 8:30
p.m. (trilingual)
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30
p.m. (Spanish), 6 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
(Kreyole)
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m. (trilingual)
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
ORLANDO
■ St. Maximilian Kolbe
15200 Tanja King Blvd. (Stone
Lakes Elementary, Avalon Park)
407-482-4282
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11:15 a.m.
Ormond Beach
■ Prince of Peace
600 S. Nova Road
386-672-5272
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 15, 3-3:45 p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 11 a.m.
Palm Bay
St. Joseph
5330 Babcock St.
321-727-1565
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 21, 9-11 a.m.;
March 22, 9-11 a.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7:30 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
8:30 a.m., noon, 3 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
7:30 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
8 a.m., 8:10 a.m., 9:45 a.m., 9:55 a.m.
11:30 a.m., 11:40 a.m.
Port Orange
■ Our Lady of Hope
4675 S. Clyde Morris Blvd.
386-788-6144
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
9 a.m., 3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
7:30 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m.
Sanford
■ All Souls
3280 W. 1st St.
407-322-3795
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 15, 9-3 p.m.
(bilingual); March 20, 8-9 p.m.
(bilingual)
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7 p.m. (bilingual)
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7:30 p.m. (Spanish)
EASTER VIGIL
7:30 a.m. (Spanish), 9:30 a.m., 11:30
a.m. (Spanish), 1:30 p.m. (Spanish),
3:30 p.m. (French), 6:30 p.m. (Spanish)
7 p.m. (bilingual)
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7:15 a.m., 8:45 a.m. (Spanish), 10:30
a.m., noon, 5 p.m. (Latin)
ORL A18
Your Orlando community
March 14-20, 2008 www.thefloridacatholic.org
A19
Advocacy and Justice column
Social ministers head to Washington for conference, lobbying
Deborah Stafford Shearer
At a national gathering in late
February, Catholics from dioceses
across the country migrated to
Washington to attend the Catholic
Social Ministry Gathering. More
than a conference on ministry, this
annual event inspires the laity to act
on the baptismal call to transform
ourselves and the world by bringing
“good news” to the poor and powerless, offering hope to those burdened by unjust social structures,
and providing opportunities to
envision a society that protects our
weakest members and promotes
the common good.
With more than 700 attendees, 18
from the Florida delegation alone,
representing 44 states, the Catholic
Social Ministry Gathering educated
participants on the social mission
of the church and the responsibility
we as believers, leaders and advocates have to be a powerful voice for
change, especially during this election year. Issues of most concern
included global and domestic poverty. More than 36 million people,
or 12 percent of the population, live
in poverty in the United States. New
opportunities for trade and Third
World debt relief policies were just
part of an overall strategy that was
discussed. The recently passed
Global Poverty Act (H.R. 1302) is
one step toward a comprehensive
plan to reduce poverty and disease.
Affordable housing is becoming
more of a crisis, exacerbated by the
subprime mortgage lending debacle. Legislative briefings offered
Catholic delegates insights into
policies that propose ways to invest
in and increase the availability of
housing and to assist low-income
families who are in jeopardy of losing their homes.
Other topics addressed included: challenges to U.S. policy in the
Middle East; immigration reform
that is more than just enforcement
in scope, but supports security and
humanitarian aid as well; health
care reform that offers a continuum of care from the unborn to the
at-risk elderly and is promoted as a
basic human right; solidarity with
Africa and options for peace in the
violence-torn Sudan; and environmental stewardship as a moral obligation of everyone who inhabits the
planet. After one intensive day of
advocacy with senators and representatives, delegates were rewarded
with the approval of a bipartisan bill ciples is an essential duty for every
that authorizes up to $50 billion for Catholic and all people of good
the President’s Emergency Plan for will,” the U.S. bishops reminded us
AIDS Relief. The bill included sev- in “Forming Consciences for Faitheral suggestions to improve the leg- ful Citizenship: A Call to Political
islation brought to the attention of Responsibility,” published in 2007.
Congress by the Catholic delegates. More than just a duty, advocacy on
Sen. Mel Martinez of Florida met behalf of justice is absolutely essenwith the Florida delegation and tial to living the Gospel.
Now more than ever the values
commented on how the Catholic Church has always been a vis- of our faith must guide the political
ible sign for the immigrant and the discussion in an effort to protect the
powerless, citing himself and his dignity and rights of every human
integration into the Florida Catholic person. Those who convened at the
community as a child from Cuba. Catholic Social Ministry Gathering
He, along with other legislators, ex- this year found that living out our
pressed their thanks to the Catholic Catholic faith has taken on a new
tradition that has helped to shape sense of moral urgency. n
the debate on issues around the
Stafford Shearer is the director of
principles of faith.
“Participation in political life in the Diocese of Orlando’s Office of
light of fundamental moral prin- Advocacy and Justice.
Holy WeekSchedules
Winter Park
Silver Springs
Viera
■ St. Joseph of the Forest
■ St. John the Evangelist
■ Sts. Peter and Paul
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
RECONCILIATION
17301 E. Highway 40
352-625-4222
7 p.m.
5655 Stadium Parkway
321-637-9650
7 p.m.
Confessions: March 15, 4-4:45 p.m.;
March 17, 6-7 p.m.; March 18, 6-7
p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
EASTER VIGIL
EASTER VIGIL
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 a.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m.
Summerfield
Wildwood
St. Mark the Evangelist
■ St. Vincent de Paul
RECONCILIATION
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7165 S.E. Highway 42
352-347-9317
Confessions: March 17, 7:30-10
a.m.; March 18, 7:30-10 a.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
6 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
8 a.m., 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m.
Titusville
St. Teresa
201 Ojibway Ave.
321-268-3441
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 17, 9-10 a.m.,
4-5 p.m.; March 18, 9-10 a.m., 11
a.m.-12 noon, 6-7 p.m.; March 19, 6-7
p.m.; March 20, 9-10 a.m.; March 21,
1-2 p.m., 4-5 p.m., 8-9 p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
8:30 a.m.; 7 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
5323 E. CR 462 • 352-330-0028
8:30 a.m., 4 p.m. (bilingual) Mass
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. (Spanish), 3 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7 a.m., 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m.
(bilingual), 1 p.m., 5:45 p.m.
Winter Park
■ St. Margaret Mary
526 Park Ave. N. • 407-647-0726
RECONCILIATION
Confessions: March 17-18, 8:30-9:30
a.m., 7-8 p.m.; March 19, 7-8 p.m.
5300 Old Howell Branch Road
407-657-6114
! "#
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3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
8 a.m., 10 a.m., noon, 3 p.m.
(Spanish), 6 p.m.
Winter Springs
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■ St. Stephen Community
575 Tuskawilla Road
407-699-5683
)
,
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! RECONCILIATION
Penance Services: March 18,
7:30-8:30 p.m.
Confessions: March 21, 4-5 p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7:30 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
3 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7 a.m., 11 a.m., 9 p.m.
HOLY THURSDAY
MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER
7:30 p.m.
GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE
!"# "$%#&'#
3 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 10:45 a.m., noon,
6 p.m.
(#%)'*%"
+%
((
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$%#&'#
8:30 a.m., noon, 3 p.m., 7 p.m.
EASTER VIGIL
8 p.m.
EASTER SUNDAY MASSES
7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., noon
10212
12873
ORL A19
A20 Your Orlando community
Florida Catholic March 14-20, 2008
Winners of Alive in Christ poster contest selected
REFLECT
From A4
Judges for the “2008 The Year of Evangelization, Celebrating 40 Years of Faith … Alive in
Christ” poster contest look over some of the pieces of art that were submitted.
Artists of all ages competed in four categoThe grand finalists are:
ries in a poster contest reflecting the theme,
Category 1, pre-k through grade three: Chris“2008 The Year of Evangelization, Celebrating tina Perito, first grade, St. Mary Magdalen Catho40 Years of Faith … Alive in Christ.” Winners in lic School, Altamonte Springs.
each category were selected March 9. All entries
Category 2, grades four-seven: Kyle Routson,
will be displayed at the Festival of Faith May 8-10 grade seven, St. James Cathedral School, Orat the Orange County Convention Center. Win- lando.
ning entries in each category will be placed in a
Category 3, grades eight-12: Ryan Maser, grade
0825768_FL_Catholic_Mar_14.qxp:FLA_9_14
Page
1
time
capsule for the diocese’s 40th anniversary 12,3/5/08
Cathedral1:23
of St.PM
James,
Orlando.
June 18.
Category 4, adult: Florence Reformata.
Fr. Paul “Pablo”
Wilhelm, O.M.I.,
comforts the poor of
Tijuana, Mexico.
The Oblates nurture the poor by easing their hunger,
sheltering their bodies, educating their minds, and inspiring
their souls to receive God.
With your Oblate Gift Annuity, you make this mission
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FLORIDA CATHOLIC PHOTOs BY ANDREA KUDLACZ
Carol Kent, one of the judges for the “2008
The Year of Evangelization, Celebrating 40
Years of Faith … Alive in Christ” poster contest
looks at one of the submissions. More than
1,000 pieces of art were submitted.
There has rarely been a better time to consider the many benefits of a
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Amount Considered: ____________________________________
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Two-life annuity rates are available upon request.
sponsorship. Cheryl has awakened the excitement in me and
given me a reason to grow in
my faith,” Pulliam said.
Pulliam and Drohan have
discussed the significance of a
physical touch of a hand on the
shoulder for the two of them.
“It means I am here with you.
It has taken on a lot of meaning for me. It is a big commitment, but one I have really enjoyed and gotten so much out
of. I really feel blessed to have
been given Cheryl and have
the opportunit y to support
her through this,” Pulliam explained.
Sepa rately, sponsor a nd
catechumen share a common
anticipation in the days leading up to the Easter vigil. “I always think about Cheryl when
I go up to Communion and I’m
looking forward to her going to
Communion for the first time.
I just hope I can see her face,”
Pulliam said.
Drohan said, “I’m actually
really anxious to take Communion. I’m looking forward
to the calm and peace.” n
FL 3/14/08
ORL A20

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